Global migration and debt

Global migration and debt

Posted 9 months ago
14 notes
The global debt clock


The clock is ticking. Every second, it seems, someone in the world takes on more debt. The idea of a debt clock for an individual nation is familiar to anyone who has been to Times Square in New York, where the American public shortfall is revealed. Our clock (updated September 2012) shows the global figure for almost all government debts in dollar terms.

The clock is ticking. Every second, it seems, someone in the world takes on more debt. The idea of a debt clock for an individual nation is familiar to anyone who has been to Times Square in New York, where the American public shortfall is revealed. Our clock (updated September 2012) shows the global figure for almost all government debts in dollar terms.

Posted 1 year ago
16 notes
Credit rating downgrade weighs heavily on European economies

The fixation on Europe’s sovereign debt crisis has inspired us to produce a series of infographics that aim to put eurozone debt into a wider, global context. Each infographic in our series maps out debt size relative to GDP – colored by credit rating and weighted with 10-year yield rates – for each major economy within a region.

Credit rating downgrade weighs heavily on European economies

The fixation on Europe’s sovereign debt crisis has inspired us to produce a series of infographics that aim to put eurozone debt into a wider, global context. Each infographic in our series maps out debt size relative to GDP – colored by credit rating and weighted with 10-year yield rates – for each major economy within a region.

Posted 2 years ago
13 notes
think-progress:

Student loan debt has ballooned since the 1990s.

think-progress:

Student loan debt has ballooned since the 1990s.

Reblogged 2 years ago from thenewrepublic
1,003 notes
borekdothu:

Who owes what to whom?

borekdothu:

Who owes what to whom?

Reblogged 2 years ago from borekdothu
12 notes
Reblogged 2 years ago from flashbender
129 notes
shortformblog:

thedailyfeed:

What would you do with $2.4 trillion?

A PBR fountain would be more cost-effective. (Also, a 12-pack of PBR is totally $5.99 in our neck of the woods.)

shortformblog:

thedailyfeed:

What would you do with $2.4 trillion?

A PBR fountain would be more cost-effective. (Also, a 12-pack of PBR is totally $5.99 in our neck of the woods.)

Reblogged 2 years ago from shortformblog
746 notes
 Mapping U.S. Foreign Debt: How Much We Owe and to Whom

Our goal with this visualization was to show which countries are  lending us money and to let people interact with data on a country by  country basis to see how this lending has changed over time. For  example, mousing over the large dot on China shows that Chinese lending  to the United States has gone from $59 billion ten years ago to more  than $1.15 trillion today, or one quarter of the total foreign owned  debt of $4.45 trillion.

Mapping U.S. Foreign Debt: How Much We Owe and to Whom

Our goal with this visualization was to show which countries are lending us money and to let people interact with data on a country by country basis to see how this lending has changed over time. For example, mousing over the large dot on China shows that Chinese lending to the United States has gone from $59 billion ten years ago to more than $1.15 trillion today, or one quarter of the total foreign owned debt of $4.45 trillion.

Posted 2 years ago
45 notes
shortformblog:

Instead of being heartbroken that Longshot Magazine didn’t take our submission, we’re going to instead offer it up to you guys. It’s a breakdown of consumer debt, including debt collection practices. EDIT: Hi-res version.

shortformblog:

Instead of being heartbroken that Longshot Magazine didn’t take our submission, we’re going to instead offer it up to you guys. It’s a breakdown of consumer debt, including debt collection practices. EDIT: Hi-res version.

Reblogged 2 years ago from utnereader
317 notes
The Debt Crisis — What Should Congress Do?
Congress must raise the debt ceiling by Tuesday or  run the risk that the government will fail to meet its financial  obligations. The House and the Senate continue to debate proposals. What  do you think Congress should do: raise tax revenues, cut programs, or  just increase the debt ceiling? Plot your response on the graph. Make  sure to indicate your level of willingness to compromise and leave a  comment to explain the choice. Each dot represents one comment. Darker  shades represent multiple comments made on a single point.

The Debt Crisis — What Should Congress Do?

Congress must raise the debt ceiling by Tuesday or run the risk that the government will fail to meet its financial obligations. The House and the Senate continue to debate proposals. What do you think Congress should do: raise tax revenues, cut programs, or just increase the debt ceiling? Plot your response on the graph. Make sure to indicate your level of willingness to compromise and leave a comment to explain the choice. Each dot represents one comment. Darker shades represent multiple comments made on a single point.
Posted 2 years ago
2 notes
Q. and A. on the Debt Ceiling

For a time it seemed safe for many people going about their summers to try to ignore the debt ceiling drama playing out in Washington. If Wall Street had not seemed overly  concerned that the United States was headed toward default, why should  anyone else worry? And there is the long history of crying wolf in  Washington: in April everyone finally got up to speed on the threatened  shutdown of the federal government just in time to see it averted by an  11th-hour deal.

Q. and A. on the Debt Ceiling

For a time it seemed safe for many people going about their summers to try to ignore the debt ceiling drama playing out in Washington. If Wall Street had not seemed overly concerned that the United States was headed toward default, why should anyone else worry? And there is the long history of crying wolf in Washington: in April everyone finally got up to speed on the threatened shutdown of the federal government just in time to see it averted by an 11th-hour deal.

Posted 2 years ago
40 notes
A Visualization of United States Debt

$15,000,000,000,000- Unless the U.S. government fixes the budget,   nation’s CREDIT CARD debt will topple 15 trillion by Christmas 2011.  Statue of Liberty seems rather worried as our nation’s  CREDIT CARD debt passes 20% of the entire world’s GDP (Gross National  Product). In 2011 the National Debt will exceed 100% of GDP, and venture  into the 100%+ debt-to-GDP ratio that the European PIIGS have  (bankrupting  nations).

A Visualization of United States Debt

$15,000,000,000,000- Unless the U.S. government fixes the budget, nation’s CREDIT CARD debt will topple 15 trillion by Christmas 2011.

Statue of Liberty seems rather worried as our nation’s CREDIT CARD debt passes 20% of the entire world’s GDP (Gross National Product). In 2011 the National Debt will exceed 100% of GDP, and venture into the 100%+ debt-to-GDP ratio that the European PIIGS have (bankrupting nations).

Posted 2 years ago
28 notes
kostasgeorgioy:

Central Government Debt as Percentage of GDP

kostasgeorgioy:

Central Government Debt as Percentage of GDP

Reblogged 2 years ago from ipad-kostasgeorgioy
12 notes
Senate “yea” votes on raising the debt ceiling, 2002-2010. With this chart Third Way argues that politics, not principle, drive the debate about the debt limit.

Senate “yea” votes on raising the debt ceiling, 2002-2010. With this chart Third Way argues that politics, not principle, drive the debate about the debt limit.

Posted 2 years ago
85 notes
US Debt Clock: All the Relevant Statistics in Real-Time

The US Debt Clock shows how the inverse of a visualization can be as  compelling and engaging, as it simply lists a huge collection of  rattling statistics related to the US debt in real-time without any  graphical translation. Not sure if any useful insight can be made,  however.

US Debt Clock: All the Relevant Statistics in Real-Time

The US Debt Clock shows how the inverse of a visualization can be as compelling and engaging, as it simply lists a huge collection of rattling statistics related to the US debt in real-time without any graphical translation. Not sure if any useful insight can be made, however.

Posted 3 years ago
4 notes