New from Juice Labs: A visualization tool for exploring text data

Like our other free visualization tools in Juice Labs, the Comments visualization is designed for ease of use and sharing. Just drop in your own data, choose what fields you want to show as text and as values, and the visualization will immediately reflect your choices. The save button gives you a link that includes your data and settings.

New from Juice Labs: A visualization tool for exploring text data

Like our other free visualization tools in Juice Labs, the Comments visualization is designed for ease of use and sharing. Just drop in your own data, choose what fields you want to show as text and as values, and the visualization will immediately reflect your choices. The save button gives you a link that includes your data and settings.

Posted 1 year ago
18 notes
theatlantic:

The Gender Divide on Wikipedia, “The Free Encyclopedia that Anyone Can Edit,” Is Even Starker than We Thought
[Image: Santiago Ortiz]

theatlantic:

The Gender Divide on Wikipedia, “The Free Encyclopedia that Anyone Can Edit,” Is Even Starker than We Thought

[Image: Santiago Ortiz]

Reblogged 1 year ago from theatlantic
84 notes

futurejournalismproject:

Graphing the Influence of Thinkers and Ideas Throughout History

Brendan Griffen has graphed a network of all people on Wikipedia with who they’ve influenced and who they’re influenced by.

Via Griff’s Graphs:

For those new to this type of thing: the node size represents the number of connections. In short, I used a database version of Wikipedia to extract all people with known influences and made this map. The bigger the node, the bigger influence that person had on the rest of the network. Nietzsche, Kant, Hegel, Hemingway, Shakespeare, Plato, Aristotle, Kafka, and Lovecraft all, as one would expect, appear as the largest nodes. Around these nodes, cluster other personalities who are affiliated (depends on distance). Highlighting communities by colour reveals sub-networks within the total structure. You’ll notice common themes amongst similarly coloured authors.

Griffen’s influence is Simon Raper who recently graphed the history of philosophy.

The tools used are similar too:

First I queried Snorql and retrieved every person who had a registered ‘influence’ or registered ‘influenced by’ value (restricted to people only so if they were influenced by ‘anime’, they were excluded).

I then decoded these using a neat little URL decoder and imported them into Microsoft Excel for further processing (removing things like ‘(Musician)’ and other annoying syntax).

I then exported these as a csv and imported into Gephi and proceeded as usual. Fruchterman-Reingold algorithm followed by Force Atlas 2. I then identified communities using ‘Modularity’ and edited the rest in Preview. Due to the size, I’ve had to zoom up and take snapshots on regions of interest.

The csv file containing all of the data can be obtained here so you can make your own maps.

And yes, as Griffen notes, the information and visualization is biased towards Western ideas and cultures since Wikipedia skews heavily toward English speakers.

Meantime, we’re absolutely gobsmacked.

Read Griffen’s post on the project. Check out zoomable version. Get yourself a pretty print.

Images: Partial screenshots of Graphing Every* Idea in History, by Brendan Griffen. Select to embiggen.

H/T: Flowing Data.

SGI Wikipedia Project

Loaded into SGI UV 2000, this massive dataset underwent full text geocoding and complete date-coding, using algorithms that identified every mention of every location and every date across the text of every entry on Wikipedia. More than 80 million locations and 42 million dates between 1000 AD and 2012 were extracted, averaging 19 locations and 11 dates per article (every 44 words and every 75 words, respectively). The connections between every date and every location were captured into a massive network representing Wikipedia’s view of history. With this instrumentation, Mr. Leetaru performed near-real time analysis over the entire dataset on the SGI UV 2 to create visual maps throughout space and time to see not only how history unfolded but also the overall tone of the world throughout the last thousand years, and interactively testing a wide array of theories and research questions, all in less than a day’s work.

Explore Geographic Coverage in Mapping Wikipedia

TraceMedia, in collaboration with the Oxford Internet Institute, maps language use across Wikipedia in an interactive, fittingly named Mapping Wikipedia.

Explore Geographic Coverage in Mapping Wikipedia

TraceMedia, in collaboration with the Oxford Internet Institute, maps language use across Wikipedia in an interactive, fittingly named Mapping Wikipedia.

Posted 2 years ago
4 notes
Watching ‘wtf Wikipedia’ as SOPA/PIPA blackout begins

While SOPA and PIPA are no laughing matter (join the strike), the reaction from those on Twitter who don’t know what’s going on is great entertainment. Do a search on ‘wtf wikipedia' for tweets from confused individuals who are trying to find information on stuff.

Watching ‘wtf Wikipedia’ as SOPA/PIPA blackout begins

While SOPA and PIPA are no laughing matter (join the strike), the reaction from those on Twitter who don’t know what’s going on is great entertainment. Do a search on ‘wtf wikipedia' for tweets from confused individuals who are trying to find information on stuff.

Posted 2 years ago
17 notes
Animated Map of Wikipedia Edits

Wikimedia Statistics produced  this animated map showing edits to wikipedia by language and location in  what they refer to as a “typical day” - May 10th 2011. The animation  starts at 12:15 GMT, giving it a European bias but you can move the  clock ahead. I don’t see an option to move the clock backwards to get  more of what happens in Asia. Here is a screen shot - click on it to get  to the animation.

Link to animation

Animated Map of Wikipedia Edits

Wikimedia Statistics produced this animated map showing edits to wikipedia by language and location in what they refer to as a “typical day” - May 10th 2011. The animation starts at 12:15 GMT, giving it a European bias but you can move the clock ahead. I don’t see an option to move the clock backwards to get more of what happens in Asia. Here is a screen shot - click on it to get to the animation.

Link to animation

Posted 2 years ago
10 notes
estersensehac:

Notabilia a visualization of deletion conversations from Wikipedia. From the project’s website: Any [Wikipedia] editor can nominate an article for deletion and, if this nomination is legitimate, a community discussion takes place where any fellow…editors have the opportunity to make their voices heard. Prompted by an email from a colleague studying these deletion discussions, Stefaner began with a data set and found his way to a graphic representation that takes the form of a tree. Each branch of the tree is a conversation, broken into segments with the “delete” or “keep” vote determining which direction it “grows.” (via PopTech : Blog : Truth & Beauty with information visualizer Moritz Stefaner)

estersensehac:

Notabilia a visualization of deletion conversations from Wikipedia. From the project’s website: Any [Wikipedia] editor can nominate an article for deletion and, if this nomination is legitimate, a community discussion takes place where any fellow…editors have the opportunity to make their voices heard. Prompted by an email from a colleague studying these deletion discussions, Stefaner began with a data set and found his way to a graphic representation that takes the form of a tree. Each branch of the tree is a conversation, broken into segments with the “delete” or “keep” vote determining which direction it “grows.” (via PopTech : Blog : Truth & Beauty with information visualizer Moritz Stefaner)

Reblogged 2 years ago from estersensehac
27 notes
Wikipedia edits on a random day

Wikipedia edits on a random day

Posted 2 years ago
7 notes