Entries and Exits: Map of a Day on the Washington Metro

The above graphic maps, per hour, entries and exits per station on a typical weekday on the Washington Metro, similar to this animation of the London Underground. Station data by hour was provided by WMATA for October 2012.

Entries and Exits: Map of a Day on the Washington Metro

The above graphic maps, per hour, entries and exits per station on a typical weekday on the Washington Metro, similar to this animation of the London Underground. Station data by hour was provided by WMATA for October 2012.

Posted 1 year ago
8 notes
thisisjamesj:

The official WMATA transit map (designed for clarity & legibility) vs. the actual geographical layout of the DC Metro
Metro_Compared (by Don Whiteside)

thisisjamesj:

The official WMATA transit map (designed for clarity & legibility) vs. the actual geographical layout of the DC Metro

Metro_Compared (by Don Whiteside)

Reblogged 1 year ago from seamusiteverwas
149 notes
A 15-minute bus map could look like this

Back in 2010, WMATA produced a 15-minute bus map that showed bus routes with frequent service throughout the day. That map was just for planning purposes, but it’s such a useful idea that I took the next step, and turned it into a more user-friendly diagram.

A 15-minute bus map could look like this

Back in 2010, WMATA produced a 15-minute bus map that showed bus routes with frequent service throughout the day. That map was just for planning purposes, but it’s such a useful idea that I took the next step, and turned it into a more user-friendly diagram.

Posted 2 years ago
3 notes

kylewpppd:

transitmaps:

How the WMATA Rush+ Maps Are Printed

Many thanks to Matt Johnson for telling me about this amazing photoset on Flickr that details the process involved in printing the new Rush+ station maps for Washington, DC’s Metro system. Click through to see the whole set!

Even as an experienced graphic designer, I was amazed to see that the maps are screen printed - each colour on the map is printed one after the other, each using a separate screen with its own spot colour ink. With a map as complex as this, that means that there are a whopping twelve different colours to print! These being: river blue, park green, National Mall green, Blue Line, Orange Line, Yellow Line, Green Line, Red Line, Silver Line, District/County border grey, Beltway grey, and finally, black.

I would have thought with the advances in digital printing and stochastic (micro) screening, that these could be produced digitally in one step instead of twelve, but maybe these are special long-lasting UV inks that will withstand many years of use without fading - an important consideration for station maps! In any case, these photos are a fascinating behind-the-scenes look at a process that many people may not even think about.

EDIT: A tweet from a Metro representative confirms that there are THIRTEEN colours used in the printing: 4 greys (Silver Line, Beltway grey, county border grey, and icon grey), 3 greens (parks, Mall, Green Line), 2 Blues (river, Blue Line), Black, Red, Yellow and Orange.

OH MY GOD! I <3 <3 <3 this more than that time I met Bieber.

Contest: Design a better Metro map

(via greatergreaterwashington.org)

Do you think you can design a better Metro map? We’re having a contest to see what a new Metro map could look like.

The traditional map has kept its basic form since 1976. Now, there are several reasons for a change. The Silver Line to Tysons Corner will open in 2014. But before that, the “Yellow and Orange Line service increase" will also force a map revision for 2012.

WMATA has retained the original map designer, Lance Wyman, to redesign the map. It’s unclear how close he’ll keep the new map to the original. But you don’t have to replicate the original. In fact, we encourage you to be as creative as you wish in designing a map

Metro Popularity, Crime and Time Visualized

Here’s a quick preview of a project I worked on last week: visualizations of Metrorail data.  I wanted to augment the Metrorail map with  three data sets I found to be both interesting and relevant to the Metro  user: average passenger boarding at each station, crime at each  station, and the amount of time it takes to get from one stop to the  next.  All of this data is publicly available information on the WMATA web site that is uniquely valuable to a Metro user.

Metro Popularity, Crime and Time Visualized

Here’s a quick preview of a project I worked on last week: visualizations of Metrorail data.  I wanted to augment the Metrorail map with three data sets I found to be both interesting and relevant to the Metro user: average passenger boarding at each station, crime at each station, and the amount of time it takes to get from one stop to the next.  All of this data is publicly available information on the WMATA web site that is uniquely valuable to a Metro user.

Posted 3 years ago
2 notes