Economic Mobility Across Generations in the USA

The Great Recession notwithstanding, can you still bootstrap yourway to success in America? After all, America is built on the idea of equal opportunity, regardless of economic status at birth. If you work hard enough, even if you were born in poverty, you too can be rich.

Economic Mobility Across Generations in the USA

The Great Recession notwithstanding, can you still bootstrap yourway to success in America? After all, America is built on the idea of equal opportunity, regardless of economic status at birth. If you work hard enough, even if you were born in poverty, you too can be rich.

Posted 2 years ago
19 notes
jmcmichael:

Business Insider: 16 Maps Of Drug Flow Into The United States

jmcmichael:

Business Insider: 16 Maps Of Drug Flow Into The United States

Reblogged 2 years ago from jmcmichael
45 notes
climateadaptation:

Over 4,000 record temperatures just in 2012. Click through to get the widget from PBS.

climateadaptation:

Over 4,000 record temperatures just in 2012. Click through to get the widget from PBS.

Reblogged 2 years ago from climateadaptation
80 notes
500 Yr Old Map Related to America’s ‘Birth Certificate’ Discovered in Munich

The American continent was “christened” by the cartographer Martin Waldseemüller. A previously unknown variant of the famous world map from the mapmaker’s workshop has unexpectedly turned up in the collections in the University Library in Munich.
When Federal Chancellor Angela Merkel officially handed over the famous map of the world printed by Martin Waldseemüller (ca. 1470 — 1522) to the Library of Congress In Washington in 2007, she referred to it as “a wonderful token of the particularly close ties of friendship between Germany and America.” And indeed, the gesture had great symbolic weight, for the chart — then exactly 500 years old — can be seen as America’s birth certificate. On this map, the New World appears for the first time under the name “America,” chosen to honor the explorer Amerigo Vespucci (1451 — 1512), whom Waldseemüller erroneously regarded as the discoverer of the continent.

500 Yr Old Map Related to America’s ‘Birth Certificate’ Discovered in Munich

The American continent was “christened” by the cartographer Martin Waldseemüller. A previously unknown variant of the famous world map from the mapmaker’s workshop has unexpectedly turned up in the collections in the University Library in Munich.

When Federal Chancellor Angela Merkel officially handed over the famous map of the world printed by Martin Waldseemüller (ca. 1470 — 1522) to the Library of Congress In Washington in 2007, she referred to it as “a wonderful token of the particularly close ties of friendship between Germany and America.” And indeed, the gesture had great symbolic weight, for the chart — then exactly 500 years old — can be seen as America’s birth certificate. On this map, the New World appears for the first time under the name “America,” chosen to honor the explorer Amerigo Vespucci (1451 — 1512), whom Waldseemüller erroneously regarded as the discoverer of the continent.

Posted 2 years ago
40 notes
datanouveau:

Nationally, the U.S. unemployment is high, but that story is wildly different across each state. Whereas Nevada’s unemployment rate is 12%, Nebraska’s—an equally-sized state—is only 4%. The Guardian’s John Burn-Murdoch* Joe Mako plotted the difference between each state’s unemployment and the national average to highlight the dispersion of joblessness across the U.S.
Not all recessions are the same, however. Each recession affects specific sectors and, therefore, specific states. The recession in the early 80s limited the money supply, so farmers and ranchers had less funds. West Virginia, Alabama, and even Iowa and Wyoming had higher-than-average unemployment rates. The most recent recession which boiled-up through a hot real estate market pushed Nevada’s—who had the largest housing boom—unemployment rate far above the national average.
*No, he isn’t a maniacally evil offspring of Rupert Murdoch and Montgomery Burns.

datanouveau:

Nationally, the U.S. unemployment is high, but that story is wildly different across each state. Whereas Nevada’s unemployment rate is 12%, Nebraska’s—an equally-sized state—is only 4%. The Guardian’s John Burn-Murdoch* Joe Mako plotted the difference between each state’s unemployment and the national average to highlight the dispersion of joblessness across the U.S.

Not all recessions are the same, however. Each recession affects specific sectors and, therefore, specific states. The recession in the early 80s limited the money supply, so farmers and ranchers had less funds. West Virginia, Alabama, and even Iowa and Wyoming had higher-than-average unemployment rates. The most recent recession which boiled-up through a hot real estate market pushed Nevada’s—who had the largest housing boom—unemployment rate far above the national average.

*No, he isn’t a maniacally evil offspring of Rupert Murdoch and Montgomery Burns.

Reblogged 2 years ago from datanouveau
16 notes
U.S. exceptionalism and billionaires

Ryan McCarthy linked to a post by Ruchir Sharma running on Ezra Klein’s blog analyzing global billionaires.
It has an accompanying chart, which fails our self-sufficiency test. That test involves erasing raw data from a chart, and figuring out how much information the graphical elements themselves convey.

U.S. exceptionalism and billionaires

Ryan McCarthy linked to a post by Ruchir Sharma running on Ezra Klein’s blog analyzing global billionaires.

It has an accompanying chart, which fails our self-sufficiency test. That test involves erasing raw data from a chart, and figuring out how much information the graphical elements themselves convey.

Posted 2 years ago
4 notes
Who Can Afford Our Congress?

Who Can Afford Our Congress?

Posted 2 years ago
18 notes
Who’s Been Working In America?

Jobs are definitely a top of mind subject. Did you know that manufacturing jobs were the largest sector of employment in 1960, yet today the category has fallen to 6th place? In this interactive visualization, browse who has been working in America over the past 50 years by sector, gender or age. Or take a look at GE’s expert opinion on the subject and tweet your own thoughts about key insights uncovered. This is best viewed in Safari, Chrome, Firefox and IE9.

Who’s Been Working In America?

Jobs are definitely a top of mind subject. Did you know that manufacturing jobs were the largest sector of employment in 1960, yet today the category has fallen to 6th place? In this interactive visualization, browse who has been working in America over the past 50 years by sector, gender or age. Or take a look at GE’s expert opinion on the subject and tweet your own thoughts about key insights uncovered. This is best viewed in Safari, Chrome, Firefox and IE9.

Posted 2 years ago
42 notes
Where Are the Foreclosure Deal Millions Going in Your State?

As part of the mortgage settlement finalized in April, 2012, the five biggest banks agreed to pay $2.5 billion to 49 states and the District of Columbia. ProPublica contacted every state to determine whether the money will be going to consumer-focused efforts related to the settlement or not. See below for a breakdown of each state’s share. This graphic will be updated periodically as more states announce their allocations. | Related: Billion Dollar Bait & Switch: States Divert Foreclosure Deal Funds.

Where Are the Foreclosure Deal Millions Going in Your State?

As part of the mortgage settlement finalized in April, 2012, the five biggest banks agreed to pay $2.5 billion to 49 states and the District of Columbia. ProPublica contacted every state to determine whether the money will be going to consumer-focused efforts related to the settlement or not. See below for a breakdown of each state’s share. This graphic will be updated periodically as more states announce their allocations. | Related: Billion Dollar Bait & Switch: States Divert Foreclosure Deal Funds.

Posted 2 years ago
5 notes
Growing Education Divide in Cities
College graduates are more unevenly distributed in the top 100 metropolitan areas now than they were four decades ago. More adults have bachelor’s degrees, but the difference between the most and least educated metro areas is double what it was in 1970.

Growing Education Divide in Cities

College graduates are more unevenly distributed in the top 100 metropolitan areas now than they were four decades ago. More adults have bachelor’s degrees, but the difference between the most and least educated metro areas is double what it was in 1970.
Posted 2 years ago
11 notes