Mapping 400,000 hours of U.S. television news | Internet Archive (originally found via The Atlantic)

IA writes: 

We are excited to unveil a couple experimental data-driven visualizations that literally map 400,000 hours of U.S. television news. One of our collaborating scholars, Kalev Leetaru, applied “fulltext geocoding” software to our entire television news research service collection.

Bonus: view a very cool four-year time lapse animation here.

Extra-special: Sunlight gave a small grant to help the Internet Archive’s TV news project in 2012. :)

From The Atlantic:

Two researchers, Mark Graham and Stefano De Stabbata, at the Oxford Internet Institute have depicted the world’s “Internet empires” in a map, [above]. The map shows each nation’s most popular website, with the size of nations altered to reflect the number of Internet users there.

The map makes for a brief, informative look at how geographic—and universal—certain web tastes and habits are.

Visualizing the Stunning Growth of 8 Years of OpenStreetMap

The U.S. OpenStreetMap community gathered in San Francisco over the weekend for its annual conference, the State of the Map. The loose citizen-cartography collective has now been incrementally mapping the world since 2004. While they were taking stock, it turns out the global open mapping effort has now mapped data on more than 78 million buildings and 21 million miles of road (if you wanted to drive all those roads at, say, 60 miles an hour, it would take you some 40 years to do it).

Visualizing the Stunning Growth of 8 Years of OpenStreetMap

The U.S. OpenStreetMap community gathered in San Francisco over the weekend for its annual conference, the State of the Map. The loose citizen-cartography collective has now been incrementally mapping the world since 2004. While they were taking stock, it turns out the global open mapping effort has now mapped data on more than 78 million buildings and 21 million miles of road (if you wanted to drive all those roads at, say, 60 miles an hour, it would take you some 40 years to do it).

Posted 10 months ago
15 notes
The Frustration of San Francisco’s Mass-Transit Riders, Visualized

The Frustration of San Francisco’s Mass-Transit Riders, Visualized

Posted 1 year ago
14 notes
sunlightcities:

Making more sense of dense data visualizations. 
-Source: Atlantic Cities 

sunlightcities:

Making more sense of dense data visualizations. 

-Source: Atlantic Cities 

Reblogged 1 year ago from sunlightcities
33 notes
Gun Violence in U.S. Cities Compared to the Deadliest Nations in the World

"We can’t put this off any longer," President Obama implored the nation last week as he introduced 23 executive actions designed to reduce gun violence in America. While the United States has the highest level of gun ownership per capita in the world, its rate of gun homicides, about three per 100,000 people, is far lower than that of Honduras, the country with the world’s highest gun homicide rate (roughly 68 gun murders per 100,000 people). But America’s homicide rate varies significantly by city and metro area, as I pointed out here at Cities a few weeks ago.

Gun Violence in U.S. Cities Compared to the Deadliest Nations in the World

"We can’t put this off any longer," President Obama implored the nation last week as he introduced 23 executive actions designed to reduce gun violence in America. While the United States has the highest level of gun ownership per capita in the world, its rate of gun homicides, about three per 100,000 people, is far lower than that of Honduras, the country with the world’s highest gun homicide rate (roughly 68 gun murders per 100,000 people). But America’s homicide rate varies significantly by city and metro area, as I pointed out here at Cities a few weeks ago.

Posted 1 year ago
360 notes
explore-blog:

The 113th Congress, by the numbers
(ᔥ The Atlantic)

explore-blog:

The 113th Congress, by the numbers

( The Atlantic)

Reblogged 1 year ago from explore-blog
1,088 notes
The Best Open Data Releases of 2012

Last year, Cities named ten of its favorite metro datasets of 2011 from cities across North America, illustrating the breadth of what we might learn (regarding mosquito traps! misplaced vehicles! energy consumption!) in the still relatively young field of urban open data. For this year’s installment, we’re going one step further. Sure, raw data is great. But useful tools, maps and data visualizations built with said data are even better.

The Best Open Data Releases of 2012

Last year, Cities named ten of its favorite metro datasets of 2011 from cities across North America, illustrating the breadth of what we might learn (regarding mosquito traps! misplaced vehicles! energy consumption!) in the still relatively young field of urban open data. For this year’s installment, we’re going one step further. Sure, raw data is great. But useful tools, maps and data visualizations built with said data are even better.

Posted 1 year ago
11 notes
80% of the U.S. Lives Within 20 Miles of a Starbucks

A Venti-nonfat-caramel-Frappuccino is no more than 20 miles away from most Americans.
University of Washington doctoral candidate James Davenport posted graphics on his blog charting Starbucks-owned locations in the country two ways: a Delaunay triangulation and Voronoi diagram (fancy names for cool diagrams). As the Atlantic Wire reports on the former, “[T]he green dots representing Starbucks cluster around big cities, and with the connecting lines, the map basically looks the same as a regular old map of the U.S.”

80% of the U.S. Lives Within 20 Miles of a Starbucks

A Venti-nonfat-caramel-Frappuccino is no more than 20 miles away from most Americans.

University of Washington doctoral candidate James Davenport posted graphics on his blog charting Starbucks-owned locations in the country two ways: a Delaunay triangulation and Voronoi diagram (fancy names for cool diagrams). As the Atlantic Wire reports on the former, “[T]he green dots representing Starbucks cluster around big cities, and with the connecting lines, the map basically looks the same as a regular old map of the U.S.”

Posted 1 year ago
14 notes
'The Worst Thing That Has Happened to Our Democratic Election System'

Andrew Cohen has been doing a formidable job of covering what is otherwise a substantially under-covered theme in this election year: the efforts to disenfranchise large numbers of voters, especially in swing states. Here are four sample installments in recent months: last week, earlier this month, in late August, and another just before that. Plus, this interview with voting-rights pioneer Rep. John Lewis. Our Garrett Epps has also been on the case, recently and notably here and here.

'The Worst Thing That Has Happened to Our Democratic Election System'

Andrew Cohen has been doing a formidable job of covering what is otherwise a substantially under-covered theme in this election year: the efforts to disenfranchise large numbers of voters, especially in swing states. Here are four sample installments in recent months: last week, earlier this month, in late August, and another just before that. Plus, this interview with voting-rights pioneer Rep. John Lewis. Our Garrett Epps has also been on the case, recently and notably here and here.

Posted 1 year ago
122 notes
theatlantic:

Mapping Acceptance of Same-Sex Marriage

According to the rule books, same-sex marriage is mostly unacceptable in the U.S. But that’s not the case when looking at the opinions of the American people. According to a new set of maps from Esri, same-sex marriage is popular in large swaths of the country.
The maps break support for same-sex marriage down by county. Green and yellow dots represent counties where people support same-sex marriage, while orange and red dots represent places where people do not. As you can see, there’s no consensus across the country.

Read more. [Image: Esri]

theatlantic:

Mapping Acceptance of Same-Sex Marriage

According to the rule books, same-sex marriage is mostly unacceptable in the U.S. But that’s not the case when looking at the opinions of the American people. According to a new set of maps from Esri, same-sex marriage is popular in large swaths of the country.

The maps break support for same-sex marriage down by county. Green and yellow dots represent counties where people support same-sex marriage, while orange and red dots represent places where people do not. As you can see, there’s no consensus across the country.

Read more. [Image: Esri]

Reblogged 1 year ago from theatlantic
499 notes
shortformblog:

thepoliticalnotebook:

13 Mexican journalist have disappeared since 2003: here’s a map of their disappearances. These folks, as Atlantic Cities notes, were most likely killed, but unlike a number of their colleagues, their bodies have never been found. The map was made by Articulo 19. They also made an infographic of instance of attacks on the media with firearms and explosives.
[Atlantic Cities]

Nothing sadder than knowing that hard-working journalists went missing on a hunt for the truth.

shortformblog:

thepoliticalnotebook:

13 Mexican journalist have disappeared since 2003: here’s a map of their disappearances. These folks, as Atlantic Cities notes, were most likely killed, but unlike a number of their colleagues, their bodies have never been found. The map was made by Articulo 19. They also made an infographic of instance of attacks on the media with firearms and explosives.

[Atlantic Cities]

Nothing sadder than knowing that hard-working journalists went missing on a hunt for the truth.

Reblogged 1 year ago from shortformblog
144 notes
A Map of Muslim Protests Around the World

If you can’t keep track of all the Muslim protests erupting across the globe, you’re not alone. The uproar over a 14-minute anti-Islam YouTube video has sparked furious protests from Somalia to Egypt to Sudan to Tunisia to Libya to Bangladesh to Indonesia to Pakistan. With new reports of protests surfacing every minute, we’ve compiled the latest reported incidents into this handy interactive Google Map. Click the locations and embedded links for more details about each incident.

A Map of Muslim Protests Around the World

If you can’t keep track of all the Muslim protests erupting across the globe, you’re not alone. The uproar over a 14-minute anti-Islam YouTube video has sparked furious protests from Somalia to Egypt to Sudan to Tunisia to Libya to Bangladesh to Indonesia to Pakistan. With new reports of protests surfacing every minute, we’ve compiled the latest reported incidents into this handy interactive Google Map. Click the locations and embedded links for more details about each incident.

Posted 1 year ago
20 notes
theatlantic:

The Gender Divide on Wikipedia, “The Free Encyclopedia that Anyone Can Edit,” Is Even Starker than We Thought
[Image: Santiago Ortiz]

theatlantic:

The Gender Divide on Wikipedia, “The Free Encyclopedia that Anyone Can Edit,” Is Even Starker than We Thought

[Image: Santiago Ortiz]

Reblogged 1 year ago from theatlantic
84 notes