The 1,000 political donors who stand to benefit most from McCutcheon v. FEC



Now that the Supreme Court has struck down aggregate campaign contribution limits, it will empower the limited number of donors who have the heart, the stomach and the bankrolls to contribute hundreds of thousands of their own money to determine who is in office.



What do we know about these truly elite donors? 1) They’re extremely partisan givers; 2)They mostly support Republican candidates; and 3) 1/3 of them come from the financial sector.



These are the Big Money givers poised to gain even more influence in our elections - what else do we know? Read more about them on Sunlight’s blog.

How 60,000 bills attempted to become a law — in one graph.
via Sunlight’s blog.

How 60,000 bills attempted to become a law — in one graph.

via Sunlight’s blog.

Posted 2 months ago
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What happens when you take historic addresses from some of our most iconic presidents and mash them together to generate one (or many) mega-speech?

We call it the State of the Union Machine. And we think it’s the cure for the common address.

GIve it a spin!

Shake Your Moneymaker: The 2013 Party Time Playlist

Happy Friday! Sunlight’s Party Time Tumblr is urging you to make like Congress today and shake your moneymaker. It’s a visual we can get down with.

politicalpartytime:

See all the state and federal legislators and political candidates that held political fundraisers at concerts in 2013.

The Sunlight Foundation scoured its Political Party Time database for political fundraisers held at concerts in 2013. And boy did we hit the jackpot: From pop princess Taylor Swift to Queen Bey, Carole King and the Rolling Stones, politicians of all stripes used the opportunity of marquee names and VIP suites to shake their moneymakers.

This, then, is a playlist of some of the songs — about money, of course — that we imagine pols heard in the process. 

Political donations by county: two decades of change.

From the Sunlight Foundation blog:

Some 30 percent of all the money raised in last year’s presidential election came from just 10 of the nation’s more than 3,000 counties, all of them in major metropolitan areas. But a high proportion of multi-millionaires placed a couple of sparsely populated Wyoming counties among the last election cycle’s highest per-capita givers.

These are just a few of the interesting patterns of political influence that the Sunlight Foundation is beginning to uncover from a partnership with a Philadelphia-based firm that specializes in mapping and geo-spatial analysis. Over the summer, we worked together to create location-based analyses of the federal campaign finance data displayed on Influence Explorer. The partnership produced new and more accurate ways to identify trends in political spending through the power of data vizualization.

The 1,000 political donors who stand to benefit most from McCutcheon v. FEC.

From Sunlight’s blog:

This portrait of the top 1,000 donors gives an insight into how lifting aggregate individual contribution caps could change the dynamics of campaigns. It suggests that Republicans would be more likely to benefit than Democrats, and that high finance would become even more central as a political gatekeeper.

sunlightcities:

Where is the Midwest? 
A new tool is asking users to draw the outline of what they consider the region to be. 
Read more at Atlantic Cities 

You guys follow our Sunlight Cities tumblr, right?

sunlightcities:

Where is the Midwest? 

A new tool is asking users to draw the outline of what they consider the region to be. 

Read more at Atlantic Cities 

You guys follow our Sunlight Cities tumblr, right?

Reblogged 9 months ago from sunlightcities
500 notes

Happy birthday, Dodd-Frank.

The massive Wall Street reform legislation turns three today, and Sunlight has an exclusive analysis about big banking’s war against the law’s implementation. One startling fact: banks and other institutions from the financial sector have gotten far more face time with federal regulators in charge of putting new regulations into effect that have consumer groups. In fact, it’s a ratio of about 14:1.

More: http://sunlightfoundation.com/feature/dodd-frank-3-year/

Putting 2012’s House results into historical context:

Last year marked the first time since at least 1946 (the first year for which Vital Statistics has data) that one party (the Democrats) won the plurality of the popular vote in the U.S. House but ended up with less than the majority of seats.

(Data via Brookings Institute and the American Enterprise Institute.)

All of the graphics!
Here’s a round-up of most of our graphics from our Political 1% of the 1% sereis. 
Catch up on the series here.

All of the graphics!

Here’s a round-up of most of our graphics from our Political 1% of the 1% sereis. 

Catch up on the series here.

Posted 9 months ago
17 notes
How do the nation’s most elite political donors spend their money?
There’s more coverage of our Political 1% of the 1% sereis here.

How do the nation’s most elite political donors spend their money?

There’s more coverage of our Political 1% of the 1% sereis here.

Posted 9 months ago
8 notes

Are the nation’s top donors adding to the polarization of U.S. politics?

The latest from our Political 1% of the 1% analysis:

As we explored in our big-picture look at the 1% of the 1%, the biggest donors in American politics tend to give big sums of money because they want one party to win. Approximately 85 percent of the top individual donors in U.S. politics contributed at least 90 percent of their money to one party or the other. By contrast, less than four percent of these donors spread their money roughly equally between the two parties (a 60-40 split or less).

The above charts break down the share of donations from the 1% of the 1% based on partisanship.

Read the analysis here: http://sunlightfoundation.com/blog/2013/06/26/1pct_of_the_1pct_polarization/

The geography of the 1% of the 1%:
It’s hard to imagine donors being more cream of the crop than those members 1% of the 1% that reside in New York.
Read more.

The geography of the 1% of the 1%:

It’s hard to imagine donors being more cream of the crop than those members 1% of the 1% that reside in New York.

Read more.

Posted 9 months ago
15 notes