futurejournalismproject:

So This is What the Internet Looks Like

Peer 1 Hosting has released free mobile apps for Android and iPhone that map the Internet.

Via Peer 1:

Users can view Internet service providers (ISPs), Internet exchange points, universities and other organizations through two view options – Globe and Network. The app also allows users to generate a trace route between where they are located to a destination node, search for where popular companies and domains are, as well as identify their current location on the map…

…[T]he app’s timeline is rooted in real data that uses timeline visualization to display 22,961 autonomous system nodes joined by 50,519 connections based on Internet topology from our partner in this project, CAIDA. We were also able to project what the Internet will look like in 2020 by using an algorithm based on current data, as well as predictions for the growth of the hosting industry by various independent research agencies.

The iPhone app is here (iTunes). The Android app is here (Google Play).

Images: Selected screens from Peer 1’s Internet Map. Select to embiggen.

joshsternberg:

firthofforth:

barthel:

themattsmith:

the-mtblog:

newsweek:

Behold! What the Stop SOPA blackout managed to accomplish in 24 hours.

This also reveals how distressingly ignorant many political representatives are. It seems they just blindly supported it without actually knowing what the hell it was about, and then when they were forced to find out, they learned, and changed their minds.


No, the number of supporters only dropped by 15, while the number of opponents went up by 70. Which is to say:
Most supporters didn’t change their minds.
Most people had no preference as of Tuesday.
Once their constituents made their preference known, they followed the wishes of their constituents.
So if there is a technical issue like this which affects you and you would like your representative to do something about it, tell them. There’s this weird expectation that political leaders, who have to address issues concerning lots of people who aren’t you (the elderly, children, farmworkers, etc.), should have all the same information we do. That’s understandable - we assume a monolithic media environment where everyone reads and watches the same things as us, even though that hasn’t been true for a decade or so, because everyone we interact with online does have the same media diet as us - but it’s not going to protect your interests. Here are some of the things the House considered yesterday: water resources in California, oil and gas rights, increasing the debt limit, the Volcker rule, and NATO’s role in the Western Balkans. SOPA/PIPA is important, but at heart it’s about allowing the DOJ or copyright holders to get a court order that would block payments to the infringer and require their ISP to deny them service. That may make sense to you, but to everyone else it’s a highly technical, niche issue. That doesn’t mean it’s not going to impact a lot of people (so is the Volker rule, and people in the Western Balkans would probably have some feelings on NATO), it just means that you can’t just expect people who deal with a lot of different shit to naturally come to the conclusions you do. You have to tell them - or, better yet, organize and find a way to get lots of people to tell them.
What happened yesterday was content providers got users to act as unpaid lobbyists, and it worked, because lobbying does. Our representatives aren’t stupid so much as they are easily distracted cats; you have to catch their attention, and if you yell the loudest, you get your way. So yell, for fuck’s sake. Don’t expect the political system to work perfectly without any input from you. And get a lot of other people to yell with you.

Barthel wins.

Now if we can only get people to vote…

joshsternberg:

firthofforth:

barthel:

themattsmith:

the-mtblog:

newsweek:

Behold! What the Stop SOPA blackout managed to accomplish in 24 hours.

This also reveals how distressingly ignorant many political representatives are. It seems they just blindly supported it without actually knowing what the hell it was about, and then when they were forced to find out, they learned, and changed their minds.

No, the number of supporters only dropped by 15, while the number of opponents went up by 70. Which is to say:

  • Most supporters didn’t change their minds.
  • Most people had no preference as of Tuesday.
  • Once their constituents made their preference known, they followed the wishes of their constituents.

So if there is a technical issue like this which affects you and you would like your representative to do something about it, tell them. There’s this weird expectation that political leaders, who have to address issues concerning lots of people who aren’t you (the elderly, children, farmworkers, etc.), should have all the same information we do. That’s understandable - we assume a monolithic media environment where everyone reads and watches the same things as us, even though that hasn’t been true for a decade or so, because everyone we interact with online does have the same media diet as us - but it’s not going to protect your interests. Here are some of the things the House considered yesterday: water resources in California, oil and gas rights, increasing the debt limit, the Volcker rule, and NATO’s role in the Western Balkans. SOPA/PIPA is important, but at heart it’s about allowing the DOJ or copyright holders to get a court order that would block payments to the infringer and require their ISP to deny them service. That may make sense to you, but to everyone else it’s a highly technical, niche issue. That doesn’t mean it’s not going to impact a lot of people (so is the Volker rule, and people in the Western Balkans would probably have some feelings on NATO), it just means that you can’t just expect people who deal with a lot of different shit to naturally come to the conclusions you do. You have to tell them - or, better yet, organize and find a way to get lots of people to tell them.

What happened yesterday was content providers got users to act as unpaid lobbyists, and it worked, because lobbying does. Our representatives aren’t stupid so much as they are easily distracted cats; you have to catch their attention, and if you yell the loudest, you get your way. So yell, for fuck’s sake. Don’t expect the political system to work perfectly without any input from you. And get a lot of other people to yell with you.

Barthel wins.

Now if we can only get people to vote…

Reblogged 2 years ago from joshsternberg
26,117 notes
Watching ‘wtf Wikipedia’ as SOPA/PIPA blackout begins

While SOPA and PIPA are no laughing matter (join the strike), the reaction from those on Twitter who don’t know what’s going on is great entertainment. Do a search on ‘wtf wikipedia' for tweets from confused individuals who are trying to find information on stuff.

Watching ‘wtf Wikipedia’ as SOPA/PIPA blackout begins

While SOPA and PIPA are no laughing matter (join the strike), the reaction from those on Twitter who don’t know what’s going on is great entertainment. Do a search on ‘wtf wikipedia' for tweets from confused individuals who are trying to find information on stuff.

Posted 2 years ago
17 notes

staff:

Yesterday we did a historic thing. We generated 87,834 phone calls to U.S. Representatives in a concerted effort to protect the Internet. Extraordinary. There’s no doubt that we’ve been heard.

So just to keep you updated: The well-intentioned, but immensely flawed “Stop Online Piracy Act” is still in the House Judiciary Committee. The hearing was yesterday and now members will debate and bring amendments to the bill. The Committee will reconvene in a few weeks — the date has yet to be scheduled. Nothing has been brought to a final vote. Everything is still very much in play. We’ll keep you posted on what’s going on and what you can do to help. But for now, we want to thank you.

One encouraging thing we heard yesterday:

I don’t believe this bill has any chance on the House floor. I think it’s way too extreme, it infringes on too many areas that our leadership will know is simply too dangerous to do in its current form.

— Representative Darrell Issa

We also want to express our tremendous gratitude to our friends at Mobile Commons who, on 30 minutes notice, hooked us up with their amazing platform (and provided their expertise) to automatically connect callers with their Representatives.

kateoplis:

Politico: Why SOPA is on the Congressional agenda

Hollywood’s in a showdown over its TV shows, movies and music with an up-and-coming opponent in the Washington arena: the Silicon Valley gang.
And that can only mean a huge payday for lobbyists.
According to figures compiled by the Center for Responsive Politics, the film, music and TV industries have spent more than $91 million on lobbying so far this year — an amount that puts them on pace to beat all of their previous spending records. 

Tell Them No

kateoplis:

Politico: Why SOPA is on the Congressional agenda

Hollywood’s in a showdown over its TV shows, movies and music with an up-and-coming opponent in the Washington arena: the Silicon Valley gang.

And that can only mean a huge payday for lobbyists.

According to figures compiled by the Center for Responsive Politics, the film, music and TV industries have spent more than $91 million on lobbying so far this year — an amount that puts them on pace to beat all of their previous spending records. 
Reblogged 2 years ago from kateoplis
812 notes