Visualizing the Stunning Growth of 8 Years of OpenStreetMap

The U.S. OpenStreetMap community gathered in San Francisco over the weekend for its annual conference, the State of the Map. The loose citizen-cartography collective has now been incrementally mapping the world since 2004. While they were taking stock, it turns out the global open mapping effort has now mapped data on more than 78 million buildings and 21 million miles of road (if you wanted to drive all those roads at, say, 60 miles an hour, it would take you some 40 years to do it).

Visualizing the Stunning Growth of 8 Years of OpenStreetMap

The U.S. OpenStreetMap community gathered in San Francisco over the weekend for its annual conference, the State of the Map. The loose citizen-cartography collective has now been incrementally mapping the world since 2004. While they were taking stock, it turns out the global open mapping effort has now mapped data on more than 78 million buildings and 21 million miles of road (if you wanted to drive all those roads at, say, 60 miles an hour, it would take you some 40 years to do it).

Posted 10 months ago
15 notes
Every recorded meteorite strike on Earth since 2,300 BCE mapped

The meteorite that struck central Russia last week, which injured around 1,000 people as it broke apart over a section of the Ural Mountains and sent shockwaves across the ground below, was but one of thousands that have impacted our planet over the past four millennia.

Every recorded meteorite strike on Earth since 2,300 BCE mapped

The meteorite that struck central Russia last week, which injured around 1,000 people as it broke apart over a section of the Ural Mountains and sent shockwaves across the ground below, was but one of thousands that have impacted our planet over the past four millennia.

Posted 1 year ago
59 notes
Be a Hurricane Sandy Disaster Response Geographer (while never leaving your computer)

Many thanks to Schuyler Erle from Humanitarian OpenStreetMap and Patrick Meier of iRevolution for creating and sharing this tool. FEMA needs help in identifying and categorizing areas in New York, New Jersey, Rhode Island, and Massachusetts which need help due to damage caused by Hurricane Sandy.  Erle and his team have created a tool using post-hurricane Civil Air Patrol photos to allow for crowd sourced rankings of damage to buildings and the natural environment.  The main portal is here while a backup mirror can be accessed here. The directions are detailed but easy to understand.  One ranks the damage as light, moderate, or heavy.

Be a Hurricane Sandy Disaster Response Geographer (while never leaving your computer)

Many thanks to Schuyler Erle from Humanitarian OpenStreetMap and Patrick Meier of iRevolution for creating and sharing this tool.

FEMA needs help in identifying and categorizing areas in New York, New Jersey, Rhode Island, and Massachusetts which need help due to damage caused by Hurricane Sandy.  Erle and his team have created a tool using post-hurricane Civil Air Patrol photos to allow for crowd sourced rankings of damage to buildings and the natural environment.  The main portal is here while a backup mirror can be accessed here.

The directions are detailed but easy to understand.  One ranks the damage as light, moderate, or heavy.

Posted 1 year ago
50 notes
Workshop: New Tools in Mapping for Disasters and Development

This afternoon InterAction and the World Bank are holding a half day workshop on GIS strategy and open source tools for humanitarian aid and international development. This workshop will be today (Thursday, May 3) from 1:00 to 6:00 pm at the World Bank here in Washington, DC.
This event comes on the heels of the InterAction Forum and the Humanitarian OpenStreetMap Team board meeting, which brought many open geo and development leaders to town. It is designed to be a conversation around the challenges facing many organizations around GIS. Proponents from NGOs, the World Bank, the OpenStreetMap community, and the private sector will share their experiences around mapping in development and aid in a series of panels and workshops.

Workshop: New Tools in Mapping for Disasters and Development

This afternoon InterAction and the World Bank are holding a half day workshop on GIS strategy and open source tools for humanitarian aid and international development. This workshop will be today (Thursday, May 3) from 1:00 to 6:00 pm at the World Bank here in Washington, DC.

This event comes on the heels of the InterAction Forum and the Humanitarian OpenStreetMap Team board meeting, which brought many open geo and development leaders to town. It is designed to be a conversation around the challenges facing many organizations around GIS. Proponents from NGOs, the World Bank, the OpenStreetMap community, and the private sector will share their experiences around mapping in development and aid in a series of panels and workshops.

Posted 1 year ago
6 notes
This looks very cool!
Watercolor Map Tiles

A couple of years ago, when you thought about online interactive maps, what came to your mind? Lots of yellow. Online maps are looking a lot different these days though, and Stamen Design has played a big role in making that happen. In their most recently released project, they offer three tile sets to use with OpenStreetMap data, and they look really good.

This looks very cool!

Watercolor Map Tiles

A couple of years ago, when you thought about online interactive maps, what came to your mind? Lots of yellow. Online maps are looking a lot different these days though, and Stamen Design has played a big role in making that happen. In their most recently released project, they offer three tile sets to use with OpenStreetMap data, and they look really good.

Posted 2 years ago
5 notes
Crisis Mapping Japan

Hi, my name is Hal Seki. I am the managing director of sinsai.info. I am CEO of Georepublic Japan, and also a member of OpenStreetMap Foundation Japan. As introduced in this blog before, we have started to run the website http://sinsai.info using the Ushahidi platform to provide information about the Great East Japan Earthquake on March 11. The website is mainly operated by the OpenStreetMap Foundation Japan, and supported by more than 200 volunteers.

Crisis Mapping Japan

Hi, my name is Hal Seki. I am the managing director of sinsai.info. I am CEO of Georepublic Japan, and also a member of OpenStreetMap Foundation Japan. As introduced in this blog before, we have started to run the website http://sinsai.info using the Ushahidi platform to provide information about the Great East Japan Earthquake on March 11. The website is mainly operated by the OpenStreetMap Foundation Japan, and supported by more than 200 volunteers.

Posted 3 years ago
76 notes