This is how jittery financial markets are, in one chart

The official Twitter account of the Associated Press was hacked, the AP reported, and the hacker tweeted out that there had been a White House explosion.

This is how jittery financial markets are, in one chart

The official Twitter account of the Associated Press was hacked, the AP reported, and the hacker tweeted out that there had been a White House explosion.

Posted 1 year ago
20 notes
State of the Union address decreasing reading level

With the State of the Union address tonight, The Guardian plotted the Flesh-Kincaid grade levels for past addresses. Each circle represents a state of the union and is sized by the number of words used. Color is used to provide separation between presidents. For example, Obama’s state of the union last year was around the eighth-grade level, and in contrast, James Madison’s 1815 address had a reading level of 25.3.

State of the Union address decreasing reading level

With the State of the Union address tonight, The Guardian plotted the Flesh-Kincaid grade levels for past addresses. Each circle represents a state of the union and is sized by the number of words used. Color is used to provide separation between presidents. For example, Obama’s state of the union last year was around the eighth-grade level, and in contrast, James Madison’s 1815 address had a reading level of 25.3.

Posted 1 year ago
49 notes
Outside Money in the House: Six Graphs and Seven Takeaways

Outside money is flooding into U.S. House races, primarily from party committees, but also significantly from dark money groups and super PACs. And though Democrats need to win 25 seats to take back the House (which most forecasters deem unlikely), nobody is giving up on anything, judging from the recent cash infusions.

Outside Money in the House: Six Graphs and Seven Takeaways

Outside money is flooding into U.S. House races, primarily from party committees, but also significantly from dark money groups and super PACs. And though Democrats need to win 25 seats to take back the House (which most forecasters deem unlikely), nobody is giving up on anything, judging from the recent cash infusions.

Posted 1 year ago
2 notes

Actually, 70% of the country would benefit more under Obama’s plan. See how you would fare.

The fall-out commentary over Mitt Romney’s “47 percent” comment has been fascinating for a number of reasons, but perhaps most of all because it has raised good questions of who actually pays for government and who benefits.

For those who want to dig deeper into these questions, there is a great new website that estimates the actual impacts of the Romney and Obama tax plans: Politify.

Based on Politify’s calculations, 69.8% of Americans would financially benefit more from the Obama plan, as compared to 30.2% under the Romney plan.

How Political Rhetoric Follows Gas Prices in Two Charts

As the price at the pump surged this winter and spring, Republicans seized the issue to attack President Obama.

Mitt Romney called on President Obama to fire his “gas hike trio,” three top Cabinet officials he accused of helping hike fuel prices. Then-presidential candidate Newt Gingrich pledged to bring back the days of $2.50 a-gallon gas. And Speaker John Boehner told his GOP troops behind closed doors that, “This debate is a debate we want to have.”

No longer.

Gas Prices on CapitolWords.org

 An Interactive Map of the Dark-Money Universe

If Citizens United was the Big Bang of a new era of money in politics, here’s the universe it formed: rapidly expanding super-PACs and nebulous 501(c) groups exerting gravitational pull on the 2012 election. Mouse over a “planet” to peer into its funding and top donors. Sizes are based on latest reported revenues (if disclosed). This data is live—come back for weekly updates.

Want to learn more about dark money? We put up a good post on the subject on Monday.

 An Interactive Map of the Dark-Money Universe

If Citizens United was the Big Bang of a new era of money in politics, here’s the universe it formed: rapidly expanding super-PACs and nebulous 501(c) groups exerting gravitational pull on the 2012 election. Mouse over a “planet” to peer into its funding and top donors. Sizes are based on latest reported revenues (if disclosed). This data is live—come back for weekly updates.

Want to learn more about dark money? We put up a good post on the subject on Monday.

Posted 2 years ago
212 notes
longreads:

Chronicling a four-decade fight over campaign finance, and how American politics is fueled by secret spending.

For decades, the campaign finance wars have pitted two ideological foes against each other: one side clamoring to dam the flow while the other seeks to open the floodgates. The self-styled good-government types believe that unregulated political money inherently corrupts. A healthy democracy, they say, needs robust regulation—clear disclosure, tough limits on campaign spending and donations, and publicly financed presidential and congressional elections. The dean of this movement is 73-year-old Fred Wertheimer, the former president of the advocacy outfit Common Cause, who now runs the reform group Democracy 21.
On the other side are conservatives and libertarians who consider laws regulating political money an assault on free markets and free speech. They want to deregulate campaign finance—knock down spending and giving limits and roll back disclosure laws. Their leaders include Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.), conservative lawyer James Bopp Jr., and former FEC commissioner Brad Smith, who now chairs the Center for Competitive Politics, which fights campaign finance regulation.

“Follow the Dark Money.” — Andy Kroll, Mother Jones
More from Mother Jones

longreads:

Chronicling a four-decade fight over campaign finance, and how American politics is fueled by secret spending.

For decades, the campaign finance wars have pitted two ideological foes against each other: one side clamoring to dam the flow while the other seeks to open the floodgates. The self-styled good-government types believe that unregulated political money inherently corrupts. A healthy democracy, they say, needs robust regulation—clear disclosure, tough limits on campaign spending and donations, and publicly financed presidential and congressional elections. The dean of this movement is 73-year-old Fred Wertheimer, the former president of the advocacy outfit Common Cause, who now runs the reform group Democracy 21.

On the other side are conservatives and libertarians who consider laws regulating political money an assault on free markets and free speech. They want to deregulate campaign finance—knock down spending and giving limits and roll back disclosure laws. Their leaders include Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.), conservative lawyer James Bopp Jr., and former FEC commissioner Brad Smith, who now chairs the Center for Competitive Politics, which fights campaign finance regulation.

“Follow the Dark Money.” — Andy Kroll, Mother Jones

More from Mother Jones

Reblogged 2 years ago from motherjones
106 notes
Choice Words

Selected words used by President Obama in his  State of the Union addresses, and by Republican presidential candidates  in their debates, television interviews and major speeches since May.

Choice Words

Selected words used by President Obama in his State of the Union addresses, and by Republican presidential candidates in their debates, television interviews and major speeches since May.

Posted 2 years ago
55 notes
2012 Election: The Candidate Match Game
Answer the following questions to see which candidate is most like you.

2012 Election: The Candidate Match Game

Answer the following questions to see which candidate is most like you.
Posted 2 years ago
73 notes
All the President’s Colleges
This infographic provides information for where all the U.S  presidents until now went to college. The colleges presidents attended  gives a perspective into the kind of person they are and what  experiences they had in their formative years.

All the President’s Colleges

This infographic provides information for where all the U.S presidents until now went to college. The colleges presidents attended gives a perspective into the kind of person they are and what experiences they had in their formative years.
Posted 2 years ago
9 notes
 Top Campaign Contributions
This infographic analysis whether wall street and top companies  “own” Barack Obama because of significant contributions they have made  to his campaign. It provides how much money his campaign and the people  in his cabinet raised during their campaigns and who were the net  contributors. It also provides the same information for top Republicans  in congress.

Top Campaign Contributions

This infographic analysis whether wall street and top companies “own” Barack Obama because of significant contributions they have made to his campaign. It provides how much money his campaign and the people in his cabinet raised during their campaigns and who were the net contributors. It also provides the same information for top Republicans in congress.
Posted 2 years ago
19 notes
thenewrepublic:

The Electoral College has always been a source of controversy in American politics. This week, Pennsylvania Republicans are looking to shift the way states apportion votes in presidential elections by switching from winner-takes-all to the Maine Plan. The latter would award one electoral vote to the winner of each Congressional district, after which two are given to the winner of the state.
This development not only poses a huge threat to Democratic states in 2012 but is also a reminder of why the Electoral College was necessary in the first place.
(Hint: It originally sought to restore balance to a system that massively overrepresented small states).
Will the system that helped Obama secure a win in 2008 prove detrimental to liberal strongholds in the next election?
Courtesy of Wikipedia

thenewrepublic:

The Electoral College has always been a source of controversy in American politics. This week, Pennsylvania Republicans are looking to shift the way states apportion votes in presidential elections by switching from winner-takes-all to the Maine Plan. The latter would award one electoral vote to the winner of each Congressional district, after which two are given to the winner of the state.

This development not only poses a huge threat to Democratic states in 2012 but is also a reminder of why the Electoral College was necessary in the first place.

(Hint: It originally sought to restore balance to a system that massively overrepresented small states).

Will the system that helped Obama secure a win in 2008 prove detrimental to liberal strongholds in the next election?

Courtesy of Wikipedia

Reblogged 2 years ago from thenewrepublic
276 notes
Visualizing the Local Effects of Recovery Spending on Job Loss

In the wake of U.S.  President Obama’s speech on jobs last night, we present this mapping of Recovery Act spending. Development Seed, the same folks who mapped the famine in the Horn of Africa, have turned their attention on America.

Visualizing the Local Effects of Recovery Spending on Job Loss

In the wake of U.S.  President Obama’s speech on jobs last night, we present this mapping of Recovery Act spending. Development Seed, the same folks who mapped the famine in the Horn of Africa, have turned their attention on America.

Posted 3 years ago
171 notes