The Neighborhoods With the Most Single Ladies (and Men)

In Washington, D.C., women often complain about the lack of available men. On the other hand, “Man Jose” gets that nickname for having too few available women for the men of Silicon Valley. But is it fact or fiction? In love, as with real estate, it’s better to get the inside scoop before you start your search.

The Neighborhoods With the Most Single Ladies (and Men)

In Washington, D.C., women often complain about the lack of available men. On the other hand, “Man Jose” gets that nickname for having too few available women for the men of Silicon Valley. But is it fact or fiction? In love, as with real estate, it’s better to get the inside scoop before you start your search.

Posted 1 year ago
34 notes

Impressive Animation of How “Manhattan West” Development Will Be Constructed Over Active Train Tracks

Imagine you had to build four towers, one of them nearly the tallest in Manhattan, on top of nearly a dozen active train tracks—without disrupting the daily train traffic. That’s the challenge faced by Brookfield Properties, the developers of the Manhattan West project a block west of Penn Station, and their team: The architecture firm of Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, mechanical engineering firm Laros, Baum & Bolles and railroad & civil engineering outfit Parsons Transportation.
The Best Open Data Releases of 2012

Last year, Cities named ten of its favorite metro datasets of 2011 from cities across North America, illustrating the breadth of what we might learn (regarding mosquito traps! misplaced vehicles! energy consumption!) in the still relatively young field of urban open data. For this year’s installment, we’re going one step further. Sure, raw data is great. But useful tools, maps and data visualizations built with said data are even better.

The Best Open Data Releases of 2012

Last year, Cities named ten of its favorite metro datasets of 2011 from cities across North America, illustrating the breadth of what we might learn (regarding mosquito traps! misplaced vehicles! energy consumption!) in the still relatively young field of urban open data. For this year’s installment, we’re going one step further. Sure, raw data is great. But useful tools, maps and data visualizations built with said data are even better.

Posted 1 year ago
11 notes
New York: Tech’s hot new hub

New York City is catching up to the Bay Area with its burgeoning population of hot companies.

New York: Tech’s hot new hub

New York City is catching up to the Bay Area with its burgeoning population of hot companies.

Posted 1 year ago
144 notes

sciencecenter:

What would a city’s CO2 emissions look like?

One ton of CO2 would fill a sphere 33 feet across. The office of the mayor of New York City decided to take this information and, given the city’s overall CO2 emissions, visualize exactly what New York’s CO2 emissions would look like if all of the gas was condensed around the center of Manhattan. The screenshots above are taken from Michael Bloomberg’s video, and the visuals are dramatic - the emissions after only an hour tower over nearby buildings, and after just one day, the Empire State Building would be swallowed by CO2. The scariest part of the whole project? New York is only the 5th worst city in terms of per capita emissions.

LEGO New York, 3D Design Based on Maps & Satellite Imagery

New York 3D artist and motion designer J.R. Schmidt created a beautiful 3D LEGO New York topographical design by using various elevation maps and satellite images of New York (as seen below) to properly set the elevation and colors of his rendered LEGO blocks.

LEGO New York, 3D Design Based on Maps & Satellite Imagery

New York 3D artist and motion designer J.R. Schmidt created a beautiful 3D LEGO New York topographical design by using various elevation maps and satellite images of New York (as seen below) to properly set the elevation and colors of his rendered LEGO blocks.

Posted 1 year ago
27 notes
The Sandy effect: how Manhattan looks on Foursquare after a hurricane

Popular check-in app Foursquare offers great data, showing the places people visit at any given time of day. The data tells a compelling story, especially for events like Hurricane Sandy.
Take a look at a visualization of check-ins in Manhattan on the Saturday prior to the storm and on Wednesday Oct. 31, days after Sandy hit. This really drives home how Sandy created two towns within Manhattan.

The Sandy effect: how Manhattan looks on Foursquare after a hurricane

Popular check-in app Foursquare offers great data, showing the places people visit at any given time of day. The data tells a compelling story, especially for events like Hurricane Sandy.

Take a look at a visualization of check-ins in Manhattan on the Saturday prior to the storm and on Wednesday Oct. 31, days after Sandy hit. This really drives home how Sandy created two towns within Manhattan.

Posted 1 year ago
36 notes
wnyc:

WNYC’s Resources:
Our After-Sandy FAQ | Transit Tracker | How You Can Help 

wnyc:

WNYC’s Resources:

Our After-Sandy FAQ | Transit Tracker | How You Can Help 

Reblogged 1 year ago from wnyc
204 notes

Occupying Wall Street: Places and Spaces of Political Action

For nine weeks last fall crowds gathered every evening at the eastern end of Zuccotti Park, where a shallow crescent of stairs creates a modest amphitheater, to form the New York City General Assembly. A facilitator reviewed rules for prioritizing speakers and gestures by which participants could signal agreement or dissent. Over two hours or more, they worked through issues of common concern — every word repeated by the assembly, which formed a human microphone amplifying the speaker’s voice — until they reached consensus.

Odd Things Happen When You Chop Up Cities And Stack Them Sideways

Take away the bums, the fashionistas, the food carts, the cabs, the colors, the smells, the sounds, cut it up and stack it on a table, New York’s grid system seems more than a little monotonous.

Odd Things Happen When You Chop Up Cities And Stack Them Sideways

Take away the bums, the fashionistas, the food carts, the cabs, the colors, the smells, the sounds, cut it up and stack it on a table, New York’s grid system seems more than a little monotonous.

Posted 1 year ago
10 notes
One World Trade Center visualised

What kind of building will become America’s tallest? On the 11th anniversary of 9/11, Online Architectural Degree has created this guide to the third tallest in the world

One World Trade Center visualised

What kind of building will become America’s tallest? On the 11th anniversary of 9/11, Online Architectural Degree has created this guide to the third tallest in the world

Posted 1 year ago
43 notes
Filming OpenGov Champions: Liz Barry

As Sunlight’s Video production Director it is my delight to be producing an ongoing video series called OpenGov Champions, featuring citizens who take action in their own ways to open up, or as in this case, contribute to, government data.
I was especially excited to go to Brooklyn, NY to film this episode in which we showcase Liz Barry from Public Laboratory for Open Technology and Science (PLOTS) and their grassroots mapping efforts. Theirs is a unique way to work with and contribute to open government data. I had watched  Liz’s TED talk about the mapping they did in 2010 of the BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf Coast. Their maps were the only high resolution images available at the onset of the spill and spread all over the world media because access to airspace was restricted and planes could not capture aerial photos using traditional methods. It all had started with Jeffrey Warren in MIT and others who were experimenting with new ways to create high resolution maps using low cost, DIY technology like kites, balloons and cheap digital cameras. When the Deepwater Horizon drilling rig exploded, they saw the opportunity to help by mapping the scope of the disaster. That’s when Liz met them and jumped right in, helping with logistics and connecting people with boats and crews. In my mind there is a rock star quality to this kind of opengov data work. And they have indeed gotten a lot of fame for their work and were a Knight News Challenge winner in 2011 among other things.

Filming OpenGov Champions: Liz Barry

As Sunlight’s Video production Director it is my delight to be producing an ongoing video series called OpenGov Champions, featuring citizens who take action in their own ways to open up, or as in this case, contribute to, government data.

I was especially excited to go to Brooklyn, NY to film this episode in which we showcase Liz Barry from Public Laboratory for Open Technology and Science (PLOTS) and their grassroots mapping efforts. Theirs is a unique way to work with and contribute to open government data. I had watched Liz’s TED talk about the mapping they did in 2010 of the BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf Coast. Their maps were the only high resolution images available at the onset of the spill and spread all over the world media because access to airspace was restricted and planes could not capture aerial photos using traditional methods. It all had started with Jeffrey Warren in MIT and others who were experimenting with new ways to create high resolution maps using low cost, DIY technology like kites, balloons and cheap digital cameras. When the Deepwater Horizon drilling rig exploded, they saw the opportunity to help by mapping the scope of the disaster. That’s when Liz met them and jumped right in, helping with logistics and connecting people with boats and crews. In my mind there is a rock star quality to this kind of opengov data work. And they have indeed gotten a lot of fame for their work and were a Knight News Challenge winner in 2011 among other things.

Posted 1 year ago
5 notes
 2011 DOT Scorecard: More Jobs, More Subway Riders, Traffic Stays Flat

While the number of employed New Yorkers has recovered from the lows of the recession, motor vehicle traffic in the city remained flat last year, with increased demand for travel being met by the city’s increasingly stretched subways, according to NYC DOT’s annual Sustainable Streets Index update.
The report, released Monday, collects data from a wide variety of sources to assess the state of the city’s transportation network. The update is part of the city’s PlaNYC 2030 sustainability initiative and builds on previous releases from 2008, 2009 and 2010.
DOT’s preliminary data shows that citywide motor vehicle traffic, measured by counting “daily weekday traffic volumes at Borough and City boundaries,” flattened out in 2011 after rising 1.1 percent in 2010. Even with 2010’s increase, in 2011 traffic remained 0.8 percent below pre-recession 2007 levels. Meanwhile, weekday subway ridership is up 2.5 percent in 2011 over 2010.

2011 DOT Scorecard: More Jobs, More Subway Riders, Traffic Stays Flat

While the number of employed New Yorkers has recovered from the lows of the recession, motor vehicle traffic in the city remained flat last year, with increased demand for travel being met by the city’s increasingly stretched subways, according to NYC DOT’s annual Sustainable Streets Index update.

The report, released Monday, collects data from a wide variety of sources to assess the state of the city’s transportation network. The update is part of the city’s PlaNYC 2030 sustainability initiative and builds on previous releases from 2008, 2009 and 2010.

DOT’s preliminary data shows that citywide motor vehicle traffic, measured by counting “daily weekday traffic volumes at Borough and City boundaries,” flattened out in 2011 after rising 1.1 percent in 2010. Even with 2010’s increase, in 2011 traffic remained 0.8 percent below pre-recession 2007 levels. Meanwhile, weekday subway ridership is up 2.5 percent in 2011 over 2010.

Posted 1 year ago
11 notes