The New Secessionists
Plotting whitehouse.gov secession petitions

The New Secessionists

Plotting whitehouse.gov secession petitions
Posted 1 year ago
321 notes

How America’s richest counties voted

felixsalmon:

There are six counties in the US with a median income of more than $100,000. Here’s the list. And here’s how they voted:

Loudoun County, Virginia: Obama 51.6%, Romney 47.2%

Falls Church, Virginia: Obama 69.1%, Romney 29.6%

Fairfax, Virginia: Obama 57.3%, Romney 41.1%

Los Alamos, New Mexico: Obama 48.7%, Romney 45.0%

Howard, Maryland: Obama 59.5%, Romney 38.3%

Hunterdon, New Jersey: Obama 40.0%, Romney 58.9%

How Obama Won Re-election

Most of the nation shifted to the right in Tuesday’s vote, but not far enough to secure a win for Mitt Romney.

How Obama Won Re-election

Most of the nation shifted to the right in Tuesday’s vote, but not far enough to secure a win for Mitt Romney.

Posted 1 year ago
5 notes
America: Elect! The action-packed journey to US election day in graphic novel form

It’s been a long – really long – campaign, one full of twists and turns, gaffes and memes. As Americans head to the polls to choose between Obama and Romney, catch up on the story so far and stay tuned for the final chapter

America: Elect! The action-packed journey to US election day in graphic novel form

It’s been a long – really long – campaign, one full of twists and turns, gaffes and memes. As Americans head to the polls to choose between Obama and Romney, catch up on the story so far and stay tuned for the final chapter

Posted 1 year ago
2 notes
Revealing All the (512) Possible Paths to Reach the White House

512 Paths to the White House [nytimes.com], designed by Mike Bostock and Shan Cartner from the New York Times Graphics Department, shows all the possible paths to victory available for either presidential candidate.
512 Paths to the White House [nytimes.com], designed by Mike Bostock and Shan Cartner from the New York Times Graphics Department, shows all the possible paths to victory available for either presidential candidate.
Posted 1 year ago
34 notes
A Campaign Map, Morphed By Money

Explore political ad spending through creative cartography. This animated map shows where superPACs and other outside groups spent their money — over a six-month period during the general election — to air political ads aimed at influencing the presidential race.

A Campaign Map, Morphed By Money

Explore political ad spending through creative cartography. This animated map shows where superPACs and other outside groups spent their money — over a six-month period during the general election — to air political ads aimed at influencing the presidential race.

Posted 1 year ago
122 notes
journo-geekery:

WaPo INTERACTIVE: Make Mitt Romney’s tax plan add up!

The last time the tax code got a deep clean was 1986. Since then, it’s been clogged back up with deductions, credits, and loopholes that have made tax time a burden for individuals and tax decisions distortive for businesses. Eliminating many of these special carve-outs would pay for a reduction in tax rates, deficit reduction, or perhaps even both.
But the minute one moves from that vague goal of making the tax code simpler into the knotty questions of what provisions of the tax code ought to be eliminated, the broad consensus breaks down. Should the next president limit the mortgage-interest deduction, and if so, by how much? Should he end the charitable deduction? What about the tax-free status of employer-provided health benefits?

The reason for trying to fill Romney’s tax plan—as opposed to Obama’s second-term plan—is that you can try filling the shortfall with a mix of tax cuts and tax increases of various types.  It explores the different party approaches and their feasibility for the current budget (setting aside the longer-term impact).  WaPo and Ezra Klein offers three generalized packages but also the ability to select options in each category.
If only ballots included stuff like this, just for measuring support.

journo-geekery:

WaPo INTERACTIVE: Make Mitt Romney’s tax plan add up!

The last time the tax code got a deep clean was 1986. Since then, it’s been clogged back up with deductions, credits, and loopholes that have made tax time a burden for individuals and tax decisions distortive for businesses. Eliminating many of these special carve-outs would pay for a reduction in tax rates, deficit reduction, or perhaps even both.

But the minute one moves from that vague goal of making the tax code simpler into the knotty questions of what provisions of the tax code ought to be eliminated, the broad consensus breaks down. Should the next president limit the mortgage-interest deduction, and if so, by how much? Should he end the charitable deduction? What about the tax-free status of employer-provided health benefits?

The reason for trying to fill Romney’s tax plan—as opposed to Obama’s second-term plan—is that you can try filling the shortfall with a mix of tax cuts and tax increases of various types.  It explores the different party approaches and their feasibility for the current budget (setting aside the longer-term impact).  WaPo and Ezra Klein offers three generalized packages but also the ability to select options in each category.

If only ballots included stuff like this, just for measuring support.

Reblogged 1 year ago from journo-geekery
231 notes
daily-infographic:

Swing states: Ohio
http://daily-infographic.tumblr.com/

daily-infographic:

Swing states: Ohio

http://daily-infographic.tumblr.com/
Reblogged 1 year ago from daily-infographic
13 notes
Outside Money in the House: Six Graphs and Seven Takeaways

Outside money is flooding into U.S. House races, primarily from party committees, but also significantly from dark money groups and super PACs. And though Democrats need to win 25 seats to take back the House (which most forecasters deem unlikely), nobody is giving up on anything, judging from the recent cash infusions.

Outside Money in the House: Six Graphs and Seven Takeaways

Outside money is flooding into U.S. House races, primarily from party committees, but also significantly from dark money groups and super PACs. And though Democrats need to win 25 seats to take back the House (which most forecasters deem unlikely), nobody is giving up on anything, judging from the recent cash infusions.

Posted 1 year ago
2 notes
 Where are all of the “binders full of women”?

Like Mitt Romney in Tuesday night’s debate, we were wondering, where are the “binders full of women” applying to work at FloatingSheep?  So, in typical FloatingSheep style, we found a very talented woman to make a map.  Montse Compa, the Humboldt State University student that produced a map of Big Bird tweets during the last presidential debate, helped us answer this question,

Where are all of the “binders full of women”?

Like Mitt Romney in Tuesday night’s debate, we were wondering, where are the “binders full of women” applying to work at FloatingSheep?

So, in typical FloatingSheep style, we found a very talented woman to make a map.  Montse Compa, the Humboldt State University student that produced a map of Big Bird tweets during the last presidential debate, helped us answer this question,

Posted 1 year ago
21 notes