Entries and Exits: Map of a Day on the Washington Metro

The above graphic maps, per hour, entries and exits per station on a typical weekday on the Washington Metro, similar to this animation of the London Underground. Station data by hour was provided by WMATA for October 2012.

Entries and Exits: Map of a Day on the Washington Metro

The above graphic maps, per hour, entries and exits per station on a typical weekday on the Washington Metro, similar to this animation of the London Underground. Station data by hour was provided by WMATA for October 2012.

Posted 1 year ago
8 notes
Washington, DC housing rental prices

Washington, DC housing rental prices

Posted 1 year ago
28 notes
thisisjamesj:

The official WMATA transit map (designed for clarity & legibility) vs. the actual geographical layout of the DC Metro
Metro_Compared (by Don Whiteside)

thisisjamesj:

The official WMATA transit map (designed for clarity & legibility) vs. the actual geographical layout of the DC Metro

Metro_Compared (by Don Whiteside)

Reblogged 1 year ago from seamusiteverwas
149 notes
michaelkulikowski-thesis:

This map I made shows the accessibility of the Metro. Each circle has a 1/2 mile diameter and centered about the points of entry to Metro Stations - they represent a 5 minute walking distance (1/4 mile) to each station. Clearly, there are a lot of holes and “access deserts,” the largest of which includes the greater Capitol Hill neighborhood (which is one of DC’s oldest and most dense neighborhoods). Further, this is a map focused on the core of the historically planned city of Washington, the access deserts only get worse as you zoom out to the entirety of the District and includes areas of the city that are most economically and socially depressed.
There is also another layer of information here that is often overlooked in evaluating transit access. Not only do these gaps, holes, and deserts make the livability of a city suppressed for residents who live outside of access areas, but this lack of access also makes the knowing, understanding, and therefore ownership of a city much more difficult for all those who live there.

michaelkulikowski-thesis:

This map I made shows the accessibility of the Metro. Each circle has a 1/2 mile diameter and centered about the points of entry to Metro Stations - they represent a 5 minute walking distance (1/4 mile) to each station. Clearly, there are a lot of holes and “access deserts,” the largest of which includes the greater Capitol Hill neighborhood (which is one of DC’s oldest and most dense neighborhoods). Further, this is a map focused on the core of the historically planned city of Washington, the access deserts only get worse as you zoom out to the entirety of the District and includes areas of the city that are most economically and socially depressed.

There is also another layer of information here that is often overlooked in evaluating transit access. Not only do these gaps, holes, and deserts make the livability of a city suppressed for residents who live outside of access areas, but this lack of access also makes the knowing, understanding, and therefore ownership of a city much more difficult for all those who live there.

Reblogged 2 years ago from michaelkulikowski-thesis
67 notes
 Wonderland Transit Map and other fictional places

Thinkgeek has a “Wonderland Transit Map” t-shirt, although they do add the caveat that static maps would probably be useless in the amorphous Wonderland.  It got me searching for t-shirts for fictional places that would be equally as useless for navigation.

Wonderland Transit Map and other fictional places

Thinkgeek has a “Wonderland Transit Map” t-shirt, although they do add the caveat that static maps would probably be useless in the amorphous Wonderland.  It got me searching for t-shirts for fictional places that would be equally as useless for navigation.

Posted 2 years ago
8 notes
Spiral map gives fun, twisted take on Metro geography

Earlier this year, our map contest generated a few new ways of looking at the Metro map, but none were as creative as this spiral map.

Spiral map gives fun, twisted take on Metro geography

Earlier this year, our map contest generated a few new ways of looking at the Metro map, but none were as creative as this spiral map.

Posted 3 years ago
57 notes

Contest: Design a better Metro map

(via greatergreaterwashington.org)

Do you think you can design a better Metro map? We’re having a contest to see what a new Metro map could look like.

The traditional map has kept its basic form since 1976. Now, there are several reasons for a change. The Silver Line to Tysons Corner will open in 2014. But before that, the “Yellow and Orange Line service increase" will also force a map revision for 2012.

WMATA has retained the original map designer, Lance Wyman, to redesign the map. It’s unclear how close he’ll keep the new map to the original. But you don’t have to replicate the original. In fact, we encourage you to be as creative as you wish in designing a map

The evolution of Metrorail, 1976-2010

During December’s snowstorm, we wrote that the worst December storm since 1982 would (and did) create a Metro system with about the same number of stations as in 1982, as did this weekend’s storm.

The evolution of Metrorail, 1976-2010

During December’s snowstorm, we wrote that the worst December storm since 1982 would (and did) create a Metro system with about the same number of stations as in 1982, as did this weekend’s storm.

Posted 3 years ago
1 note
buildingmuseum:

Related to our last post: an infographic on DC’s late night Metro use created by Flickr user HerrVebah.

buildingmuseum:

Related to our last post: an infographic on DC’s late night Metro use created by Flickr user HerrVebah.

Reblogged 3 years ago from buildingmuseum
3 notes