flavorpill:

Joseph Heller’s chart outline for Catch-22. Check out the full gallery of Famous Authors’ Handwritten Outlines.

flavorpill:

Joseph Heller’s chart outline for Catch-22. Check out the full gallery of Famous Authors’ Handwritten Outlines.

Reblogged 1 year ago from ilovecharts
999 notes
Clever Posters Chart the Colors in Famous Novels

What colors are the insides of your favorite novels? Well, sure, the off-white of a book page — but what about the worlds they create? In artist Jaz Parkinson‘s color charts project, he has created graphic signatures of novels’ visual content, building mini rainbows that correspond to classic works.

Clever Posters Chart the Colors in Famous Novels

What colors are the insides of your favorite novels? Well, sure, the off-white of a book page — but what about the worlds they create? In artist Jaz Parkinson‘s color charts project, he has created graphic signatures of novels’ visual content, building mini rainbows that correspond to classic works.

Posted 1 year ago
23 notes
shadesofbrixton:

Ray Bradbury’s Predictions Fulfilled. Source.

shadesofbrixton:

Ray Bradbury’s Predictions Fulfilled. Source.

Reblogged 1 year ago from shadesofbrixton
47 notes
huffingtonpost:

Dystopian Timeline From ‘Nineteen Eighty-Four’ To The Hunger Games

huffingtonpost:

Dystopian Timeline From ‘Nineteen Eighty-Four’ To The Hunger Games

Reblogged 2 years ago from huffingtonpost
106 notes
guardian:

Shakespeare on a Tube map - an oldie but a good one.
Madrid’s equivalent Oxford Street, the shopaholic Puerta del Sol stop, has been snapped up by Samsung in a month-long deal and renamed Sol Galaxy Note. What would you rename stations on the London Underground?
Liking newenergyspace’s suggestions:

Toshiba-kerstreetMars-enalFujiCam-den RoadSloans-for-you-SquarePremium Bond StreetLadbroke’s GroveBarclays-water

guardian:

Shakespeare on a Tube map - an oldie but a good one.

Madrid’s equivalent Oxford Street, the shopaholic Puerta del Sol stop, has been snapped up by Samsung in a month-long deal and renamed Sol Galaxy Note. What would you rename stations on the London Underground?

Liking newenergyspace’s suggestions:

Toshiba-kerstreet

Mars-enal

FujiCam-den Road

Sloans-for-you-Square

Premium Bond Street

Ladbroke’s Grove

Barclays-water

Reblogged 2 years ago from guardian
59 notes
theatlantic:

And (another!) literary map of the United States. [Literary Gift Company]

theatlantic:

And (another!) literary map of the United States. [Literary Gift Company]

Reblogged 2 years ago from theatlantic
643 notes
futurejournalismproject:

Visualizing Books
The Book Genome Project explores the internal “DNA” of books much in the same way Pandora launched the Music Genome Project to explore the internal workings of a song.
Shown here is a visualization A Year and a Day by Virginia Henley, a novel that takes place in medieval Scotland (think Braveheart) and tells the story of a romance between a conquering warrior and a woman whose castle he invades.
Via Booklamp:

A book isn’t a flat, two-dimensional thing, so book summary statistics – such as that a book is 17% about Vampires – only partially represents what a book is about. Any reader will tell you that a book has ebbs and flows, like currents in a river. Like a Thematic Current. And visualizing it can be interesting…
…As you can see, the thematic currents [in A Year and a Day] deal heavily with ancient or medieval setting, strong romance, family (much of the story deals with having heirs), and warfare. More specifically, you can see where major battles occur, where major romantic engagements occur, and where pain and suffering occurs during and after combat.

Image: Detail from Visualizing the Thematic Flow of a Book. Via Booklamp.org.
H/T: Chart Porn.

futurejournalismproject:

Visualizing Books

The Book Genome Project explores the internal “DNA” of books much in the same way Pandora launched the Music Genome Project to explore the internal workings of a song.

Shown here is a visualization A Year and a Day by Virginia Henley, a novel that takes place in medieval Scotland (think Braveheart) and tells the story of a romance between a conquering warrior and a woman whose castle he invades.

Via Booklamp:

A book isn’t a flat, two-dimensional thing, so book summary statistics – such as that a book is 17% about Vampires – only partially represents what a book is about. Any reader will tell you that a book has ebbs and flows, like currents in a river. Like a Thematic Current. And visualizing it can be interesting…

…As you can see, the thematic currents [in A Year and a Day] deal heavily with ancient or medieval setting, strong romance, family (much of the story deals with having heirs), and warfare. More specifically, you can see where major battles occur, where major romantic engagements occur, and where pain and suffering occurs during and after combat.

Image: Detail from Visualizing the Thematic Flow of a Book. Via Booklamp.org.

H/T: Chart Porn.

Reblogged 2 years ago from futurejournalismproject
25 notes
bashford:

“Using technology not just for the sake of it but as an aid device in order to design with it, we built some custom tools. Those tools allowed us to experiment with the type of Shakespeare’s «Romeo & Juliet». Along this text the word Juliet appears 180 times and the word Romeo another 308 times. We finally brought them together with 55,440 red lines.”
Romeo and Juliet Poster by Beetroot Design Group

bashford:

“Using technology not just for the sake of it but as an aid device in order to design with it, we built some custom tools. Those tools allowed us to experiment with the type of Shakespeare’s «Romeo & Juliet». Along this text the word Juliet appears 180 times and the word Romeo another 308 times. We finally brought them together with 55,440 red lines.”

Romeo and Juliet Poster by Beetroot Design Group

Reblogged 2 years ago from bashford
25 notes
revolverstudio:

We Are The Friction is a full-color pub­li­ca­tion cre­ated by Sing Statistics

revolverstudio:

We Are The Friction is a full-color pub­li­ca­tion cre­ated by Sing Statistics

Reblogged 2 years ago from revolverstudio
530 notes
Reblogged 2 years ago from ilovecharts
1,497 notes
 The Go-to Snacks of Literary Greats

I’m not the squealing type, but couldn’t help but let out a delighted squeak at the sight of this illustration of famous writers’ favorite snacks by Wendy MacNaughton for the New York Times. MacNaughton  confesses to munching on garlic croutons as she works, which I can  totally get behind. Personally, I go for Red Vines.

The Go-to Snacks of Literary Greats

I’m not the squealing type, but couldn’t help but let out a delighted squeak at the sight of this illustration of famous writers’ favorite snacks by Wendy MacNaughton for the New York Times. MacNaughton confesses to munching on garlic croutons as she works, which I can totally get behind. Personally, I go for Red Vines.

Posted 2 years ago
781 notes
curiositycounts:

Friends, Lovers, and Family – visualizing the relationships between literary greats

curiositycounts:

Friends, Lovers, and Family – visualizing the relationships between literary greats

Reblogged 3 years ago from curiositycounts
50 notes
Literary stature graphic from 1906

Greg Ross highlights an old school graphic from The Strand Magazine, published in 1906. Authors are sized by how much the public read his or her work at the time.

The giant is Dickens, followed by Thackeray and the now  largely forgotten Hall Caine. Lesser mortals, left to right, are Thomas  Hardy, Mary Elizabeth Braddon, Marie Corelli, Rudyard Kipling, Mary  Augusta Ward, J.M. Barrie, Arthur Conan Doyle, Stanley Weyman, Robert  Louis Stevenson, Walter Scott, Henry James, Charlotte Brontë, George  Meredith, Anthony Trollope, Charles Kingsley, Edward Bulwer-Lytton,  Israel Zangwill, Charles Reade, and E.F. Benson.

Literary stature graphic from 1906

Greg Ross highlights an old school graphic from The Strand Magazine, published in 1906. Authors are sized by how much the public read his or her work at the time.

The giant is Dickens, followed by Thackeray and the now largely forgotten Hall Caine. Lesser mortals, left to right, are Thomas Hardy, Mary Elizabeth Braddon, Marie Corelli, Rudyard Kipling, Mary Augusta Ward, J.M. Barrie, Arthur Conan Doyle, Stanley Weyman, Robert Louis Stevenson, Walter Scott, Henry James, Charlotte Brontë, George Meredith, Anthony Trollope, Charles Kingsley, Edward Bulwer-Lytton, Israel Zangwill, Charles Reade, and E.F. Benson.

Posted 3 years ago
11 notes