Damn, this periodic table is beautiful

In May 1949, LIFE Magazine published a stunning series of images to accompany an issue dedicated largely to The Atom. You can check out the feature in its entirety here, but the reimagination of the periodic table of elements as a colorful spiral is easily one of the most striking graphics of the lot.

Damn, this periodic table is beautiful

In May 1949, LIFE Magazine published a stunning series of images to accompany an issue dedicated largely to The Atom. You can check out the feature in its entirety here, but the reimagination of the periodic table of elements as a colorful spiral is easily one of the most striking graphics of the lot.

Posted 10 months ago
75 notes
Life Chart - Beta

This is my first take at visualizing general tasks I do daily between age 0-32. It also highlights significant events of the last 20 years. I am hoping to expand it to showcase more events, perhaps find some way to illustrate work vs play and how sometimes the line blurs.

Life Chart - Beta

This is my first take at visualizing general tasks I do daily between age 0-32. It also highlights significant events of the last 20 years. I am hoping to expand it to showcase more events, perhaps find some way to illustrate work vs play and how sometimes the line blurs.

Posted 1 year ago
4 notes
The Forgetting Machine: Notes Toward a History of Detroit

The classic text on ruins is Edward Gibbon’s The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire,  completed during the last decades of the 18th century, when the English  were cultivating a special interest in historical empires that their  own advancing empire might yet surpass — a compensatory preoccupation  brought on by the recent loss of the American colonies. Toward the end  of his massive opus, Gibbon contemplates what it would have been like to  “discover” Rome in that late medieval moment when the great metropolis  was first appreciated as a ruin.

The Forgetting Machine: Notes Toward a History of Detroit

The classic text on ruins is Edward Gibbon’s The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, completed during the last decades of the 18th century, when the English were cultivating a special interest in historical empires that their own advancing empire might yet surpass — a compensatory preoccupation brought on by the recent loss of the American colonies. Toward the end of his massive opus, Gibbon contemplates what it would have been like to “discover” Rome in that late medieval moment when the great metropolis was first appreciated as a ruin.

Posted 2 years ago
15 notes