Who’s Been Working In America?

Jobs are definitely a top of mind subject. Did you know that manufacturing jobs were the largest sector of employment in 1960, yet today the category has fallen to 6th place? In this interactive visualization, browse who has been working in America over the past 50 years by sector, gender or age. Or take a look at GE’s expert opinion on the subject and tweet your own thoughts about key insights uncovered. This is best viewed in Safari, Chrome, Firefox and IE9.

Who’s Been Working In America?

Jobs are definitely a top of mind subject. Did you know that manufacturing jobs were the largest sector of employment in 1960, yet today the category has fallen to 6th place? In this interactive visualization, browse who has been working in America over the past 50 years by sector, gender or age. Or take a look at GE’s expert opinion on the subject and tweet your own thoughts about key insights uncovered. This is best viewed in Safari, Chrome, Firefox and IE9.

Posted 2 years ago
42 notes
ourtimeorg:

Only 31% of available jobs actually require a bachelor’s degree and many pundits are starting to question the value of college. Is a vocational degree a better investment? What do you think? LIKE this post and COMMENT below! 
For more translations, go to www.ourtime.org

ourtimeorg:

Only 31% of available jobs actually require a bachelor’s degree and many pundits are starting to question the value of college. Is a vocational degree a better investment? What do you think? LIKE this post and COMMENT below! 

For more translations, go to www.ourtime.org

Reblogged 2 years ago from ourtimeorg
230 notes
Would You Be Better Off in a Different City?

Most of us tend to make one of the biggest decisions of our lives – where to live – on vague notions of which city has the most jobs or the best coffee shops or Chinese restaurants. But the cost of living and quality of life varies widely across the country, particularly depending on what you do and which expenses you carry, and chances are you may not be living where economic data suggests you’d be the most comfortable.
Now an app just unveiled this week can calculate all of this for you (we are not suggesting you peruse the Bureau of Labor Statistics on your own). Upwardly Mobile, a new tool from Sunlight Foundation, can take your career information and your spending priorities and figure out where it makes the most sense to be a library archivist with children in daycare and cars to gas up.

Would You Be Better Off in a Different City?

Most of us tend to make one of the biggest decisions of our lives – where to live – on vague notions of which city has the most jobs or the best coffee shops or Chinese restaurants. But the cost of living and quality of life varies widely across the country, particularly depending on what you do and which expenses you carry, and chances are you may not be living where economic data suggests you’d be the most comfortable.

Now an app just unveiled this week can calculate all of this for you (we are not suggesting you peruse the Bureau of Labor Statistics on your own). Upwardly Mobile, a new tool from Sunlight Foundation, can take your career information and your spending priorities and figure out where it makes the most sense to be a library archivist with children in daycare and cars to gas up.

Posted 2 years ago
20 notes
Put Down That Computer (It’s Killing You)

Put Down That Computer (It’s Killing You)

Posted 2 years ago
4 notes
The 100 Best Companies to work for

Meet this year’s top 100, network with the winners on LinkedIn, and more.

The 100 Best Companies to work for

Meet this year’s top 100, network with the winners on LinkedIn, and more.

Posted 2 years ago
6 notes
franzstrasser:

(via Employment: Defending jobs | The Economist)

franzstrasser:

(via Employment: Defending jobs | The Economist)

Reblogged 3 years ago from joshsternberg
279 notes
Visualizing the Local Effects of Recovery Spending on Job Loss

In the wake of U.S.  President Obama’s speech on jobs last night, we present this mapping of Recovery Act spending. Development Seed, the same folks who mapped the famine in the Horn of Africa, have turned their attention on America.

Visualizing the Local Effects of Recovery Spending on Job Loss

In the wake of U.S.  President Obama’s speech on jobs last night, we present this mapping of Recovery Act spending. Development Seed, the same folks who mapped the famine in the Horn of Africa, have turned their attention on America.

Posted 3 years ago
171 notes

Data Visualization Fellowship with Sunlight Foundation

futurejournalismproject:

This is hot:

The Sunlight Foundation is seeking a social scientist who can help us create compelling visualizations, tell richer stories, and incorporate more of their discipline’s work into our own. Sunlight’s work frequently includes examinations of political influence. The questions surrounding this issue have been studied by political scientists, economists and sociologists for decades. We believe that our work can benefit from this tradition of scholarship; and we believe that the tools, technologies and practical expertise of Sunlight’s reporters and technologists could help to inform scholarly investigations of political influence. This fellowship is an effort to encourage cross-pollination between two communities that have been examining the same question from different perspectives…

Qualified candidates are doctoral students working in the field or recent graduates of such programs.

Full listing and information here.

And don’t forget to visit the Sunlight Tumblr.

The Economic Rebound: It Isn’t What You Think

As the US economy slowly rebuilds and the smoke from  four years of charred capital starts to dissipate, we can discern the  shape of the next 20 years of job growth. What we see is an economy  unlike any we’ve ever known.

The Economic Rebound: It Isn’t What You Think

As the US economy slowly rebuilds and the smoke from four years of charred capital starts to dissipate, we can discern the shape of the next 20 years of job growth. What we see is an economy unlike any we’ve ever known.

Posted 3 years ago
16 notes
The Post-Grad Hipster’s Guide to Inhabitable U.S. Cities. 
Since you all liked the last hipster map we posted so much, here’s a lark from Wesleyan University student blog Wesleying.

The Post-Grad Hipster’s Guide to Inhabitable U.S. Cities. 

Since you all liked the last hipster map we posted so much, here’s a lark from Wesleyan University student blog Wesleying.

Posted 3 years ago
23 notes
Slate jobs maps

As the economic crisis took up permanent residence in the United States in the spring of 2009, Slate attempted to visualize the carnage in a simple and meaningful way. The result was this map, which tracks the losses or gains in jobs in every U.S. county from January of 2007 to the most recently available data.

Slate jobs maps

As the economic crisis took up permanent residence in the United States in the spring of 2009, Slate attempted to visualize the carnage in a simple and meaningful way. The result was this map, which tracks the losses or gains in jobs in every U.S. county from January of 2007 to the most recently available data.

Posted 3 years ago
5 notes