From The Atlantic:

Two researchers, Mark Graham and Stefano De Stabbata, at the Oxford Internet Institute have depicted the world’s “Internet empires” in a map, [above]. The map shows each nation’s most popular website, with the size of nations altered to reflect the number of Internet users there.

The map makes for a brief, informative look at how geographic—and universal—certain web tastes and habits are.

Someone Please Help

Someone Please Help

Posted 1 year ago
17 notes
lmbgp:

Who runs the Internet? A poster put together by the folks at ICANN.

Source: http://www.govtech.com/e-government/Who-Runs-the-Internet-Infographic.html

lmbgp:

Who runs the Internet? A poster put together by the folks at ICANN.

Source: http://www.govtech.com/e-government/Who-Runs-the-Internet-Infographic.html

Reblogged 1 year ago from lmbgp
20 notes
matthurst:

And this is what NYC’s internet infrastructure looks like on a map

matthurst:

And this is what NYC’s internet infrastructure looks like on a map

Reblogged 2 years ago from matthurst
9 notes
Internet content blocking travels downstream, affects unwary users

A team of Canadian researchers have uncovered an unusual new example of “upstream filtering,” where online content in one country is blocked in another country due to filtering that happens in transit.
Researchers at the Citizen Lab at the Munk School of Global Affairs at the University of Toronto, revealed that some Oman Internet users using the Omantel ISP are also being subjected to Indian content restrictions because of traffic flowing through India.

Internet content blocking travels downstream, affects unwary users

A team of Canadian researchers have uncovered an unusual new example of “upstream filtering,” where online content in one country is blocked in another country due to filtering that happens in transit.

Researchers at the Citizen Lab at the Munk School of Global Affairs at the University of Toronto, revealed that some Oman Internet users using the Omantel ISP are also being subjected to Indian content restrictions because of traffic flowing through India.

Posted 2 years ago
38 notes
Mapping the internet
If the internet is a global phenomenon, it’s because there are fiber-optic cables underneath the ocean. Light goes in on one shore and comes out the other, making these tubes the fundamental conduit of information throughout the global village. To make the light travel enormous distances, thousands of volts of electricity are sent through the cable’s copper sleeve to power repeaters, each the size and roughly the shape of a 600-pound bluefin tuna. Once a cable reaches a coast, it enters a building known as a “landing station” that receives and transmits the flashes of light sent across the water. The fiber-optic lines then connect to key hubs, known as “Internet exchange points,” which, for the most part, follow geography and population.

Mapping the internet

If the internet is a global phenomenon, it’s because there are fiber-optic cables underneath the ocean. Light goes in on one shore and comes out the other, making these tubes the fundamental conduit of information throughout the global village. To make the light travel enormous distances, thousands of volts of electricity are sent through the cable’s copper sleeve to power repeaters, each the size and roughly the shape of a 600-pound bluefin tuna. Once a cable reaches a coast, it enters a building known as a “landing station” that receives and transmits the flashes of light sent across the water. The fiber-optic lines then connect to key hubs, known as “Internet exchange points,” which, for the most part, follow geography and population.
Posted 2 years ago
28 notes
The Evolution of the Web

The Evolution of the Web

Posted 2 years ago
11 notes
futurejournalismproject:

Country Codes of the World
Via ByteLevel.

futurejournalismproject:

Country Codes of the World

Via ByteLevel.

Reblogged 2 years ago from copyeditor
103 notes
martab:

Internet users by country 2010 (handmade visualized) (by jose.duarte)

martab:

Internet users by country 2010 (handmade visualized) (by jose.duarte)

Reblogged 2 years ago from martab
15 notes
datavis:

Data Breach by The Surgery for Raconteur

datavis:

Data Breach by The Surgery for Raconteur

Reblogged 2 years ago from datavis
24 notes
curiositycounts:

Not only is Facebook now as big as the entire Internet was in 2004, but its total user base eclipses the population of many countries

curiositycounts:

Not only is Facebook now as big as the entire Internet was in 2004, but its total user base eclipses the population of many countries

Reblogged 2 years ago from curiositycounts
135 notes
Interactive map of the internet’s underwater paths

Ever wondered how your email can cross the vastness of the ocean and  be delivered almost instantly, anywhere in the world? It’s all down to a  network of fibre-optic cables that link up the continents and transmit  terabits of data every second.

Interactive map of the internet’s underwater paths

Ever wondered how your email can cross the vastness of the ocean and be delivered almost instantly, anywhere in the world? It’s all down to a network of fibre-optic cables that link up the continents and transmit terabits of data every second.

Posted 2 years ago
929 notes
 The Internet of Things 
This infographic provides a snapshot of how the number of connected  devices has exploded since the birth of the Internet and the PC, as  well as a glimpse forward to 2020.  The Internet may be huge, but it’s  going to get alot bigger.

The Internet of Things

This infographic provides a snapshot of how the number of connected devices has exploded since the birth of the Internet and the PC, as well as a glimpse forward to 2020. The Internet may be huge, but it’s going to get alot bigger.
Posted 2 years ago
80 notes
Interactive map of undersea cables

Interactive map of undersea cables

Posted 3 years ago
114 notes