Via the Wall Street Journal: How mergers made Comcast and Time Warner Cable have become two of the biggest corporations in the United States.
The two corporate giants traveled to the Senate Judiciary Committee this morning to discuss the telecom merger to end all telecom mergers.
Sunlight also has context on the political influence efforts from both companies.

Via the Wall Street Journal: How mergers made Comcast and Time Warner Cable have become two of the biggest corporations in the United States.

The two corporate giants traveled to the Senate Judiciary Committee this morning to discuss the telecom merger to end all telecom mergers.

Sunlight also has context on the political influence efforts from both companies.

Posted 1 week ago
25 notes
How 60,000 bills attempted to become a law — in one graph.
via Sunlight’s blog.

How 60,000 bills attempted to become a law — in one graph.

via Sunlight’s blog.

Posted 2 months ago
10 notes
Inside the $400-million political network backed by the Koch brothers, via the Washington Post and OpenSecrets.org. (Graphic)

The resources and the breadth of the organization make it singular in American politics: an operation conducted outside the campaign finance system, employing an array of groups aimed at stopping what its financiers view as government overreach. Members of the coalition target different constituencies but together have mounted attacks on the new health-care law, federal spending and environmental regulations.

Inside the $400-million political network backed by the Koch brothers, via the Washington Post and OpenSecrets.org. (Graphic)

The resources and the breadth of the organization make it singular in American politics: an operation conducted outside the campaign finance system, employing an array of groups aimed at stopping what its financiers view as government overreach. Members of the coalition target different constituencies but together have mounted attacks on the new health-care law, federal spending and environmental regulations.

Posted 3 months ago
37 notes

Liz Cheney And The Family Business: A Chart of All Congressional Dynasties

From Time’s Swampland blog:

During an appearance on ABC’s “This Week with George Stephanopolous” on Sunday, former vice president Dick Cheney was bullish on his daughter Liz’s chances of winning the Republican Senate primary in Wyoming next summer, stating flatly that she is “going to win.”  The younger Cheney is challenging three-term senator Mike Enzi in a much-watched race that won’t be decided until August.

A poll with a sample size of one consisting of the candidate’s father is bound to have a few statistical weaknesses. Should Dick Cheney’s prophecy come true, however, his daughter will have amble company in the fraternity of lawmakers with relatives who served in past or present congresses.

According to TIME’s analysis of the Congressional Biographical Directory, which includes family relationships between past and present lawmakers, there are 37 current members who have a relative who served in Congress. Here, those lineages are arranged in a chart from newest to oldest names.

Via FastCoDesign and Information Is Beautiful:
How Many Lines Of Code Is Your Favorite App?

A military drone has 3.5 million lines of code inside. That’s roughly three times as many as we find in bacteria, meaning that mankind has, at least by one metric, constructed semi-autonomous machinery more complex than life itself.
Interestingly enough, you’ll note that software is not getting longer as time goes on. Windows Vista (2007), for instance, had 50 million lines of code, while Windows 7 shaved that figure down to 40 million. […] Meanwhile, mobile operating systems like Android have been engineered as ultra lightweight, built from just over 10 million lines of code.
But be sure to read the graphic all the way to the bottom. The kicker is a doozy.

Via FastCoDesign and Information Is Beautiful:

How Many Lines Of Code Is Your Favorite App?

A military drone has 3.5 million lines of code inside. That’s roughly three times as many as we find in bacteria, meaning that mankind has, at least by one metric, constructed semi-autonomous machinery more complex than life itself.

Interestingly enough, you’ll note that software is not getting longer as time goes on. Windows Vista (2007), for instance, had 50 million lines of code, while Windows 7 shaved that figure down to 40 million. […] Meanwhile, mobile operating systems like Android have been engineered as ultra lightweight, built from just over 10 million lines of code.

But be sure to read the graphic all the way to the bottom. The kicker is a doozy.

Posted 5 months ago
33 notes

Most regulations get little attention from the public (and a lot from special interest groups).

As Bill Clinton tries to serve as Obamacare’s salesman in chief today, furious behind-the-scenes efforts are underway to influence how the writing of the rules that will implement the law. Of all the regulations under consideration by the federal government as of late last year, those involving health care were drawing the most comments, an analysis by Sunlight shows.

The top graphic displays how many comments have been counted on regulatory dockets, with health care by far outweighing other issues. To interact with the comments, visit the graphic here: http://assets.sunlightlabs.com.s3.amazonaws.com/regs_viz/treemap.html

FastCompany: America’s weakest and strongest coffee makers 

FastCompany: America’s weakest and strongest coffee makers 

Posted 8 months ago
130 notes
The SyFy channel FINALLY released Sharknado last night, its much-hyped TV-movie about a shark-infested tornado, and the aftermath wrought by that synergistic whirlwind. Many of us here at Sunlight are also fans of what we can only assume stood as some inspiration for the film, the epic Mega Shark vs. Giant Octopus, as well as this infographic, created by Steve Taubman. We thought we’d post it in homage. 
Steve has more infographics that you should check out over at his blog.
(h/t to Sunlight’s @tjl for the inspiration.)

The SyFy channel FINALLY released Sharknado last night, its much-hyped TV-movie about a shark-infested tornado, and the aftermath wrought by that synergistic whirlwind. Many of us here at Sunlight are also fans of what we can only assume stood as some inspiration for the film, the epic Mega Shark vs. Giant Octopus, as well as this infographic, created by Steve Taubman. We thought we’d post it in homage. 

Steve has more infographics that you should check out over at his blog.

(h/t to Sunlight’s @tjl for the inspiration.)

Posted 9 months ago
28 notes
All of the graphics!
Here’s a round-up of most of our graphics from our Political 1% of the 1% sereis. 
Catch up on the series here.

All of the graphics!

Here’s a round-up of most of our graphics from our Political 1% of the 1% sereis. 

Catch up on the series here.

Posted 9 months ago
17 notes
The Political 1% of the 1%: Meet the Gatekeepers of U.S. Elections
All this week, Sunlight is rolling out a new analysis on an elite group of 31,385 political donors. This group represents .01% of the U.S. population — a group of individuals so small, it can’t even fill a football stadium. Yet last election, they accounted for more than 28% of the total funds in the 2012 election. 
Stay tuned all week as we roll out more graphics and visuals accompanying the series here on our tumblr.

The Political 1% of the 1%: Meet the Gatekeepers of U.S. Elections

All this week, Sunlight is rolling out a new analysis on an elite group of 31,385 political donors. This group represents .01% of the U.S. population — a group of individuals so small, it can’t even fill a football stadium. Yet last election, they accounted for more than 28% of the total funds in the 2012 election. 

Stay tuned all week as we roll out more graphics and visuals accompanying the series here on our tumblr.

Posted 9 months ago
124 notes
As the farm bill heads to the floor, we noticed that all but two current senators have received cash from the agribusiness industry. And the agricultural world has spent their campaign cash quite strategically.In fact, half of the $26 million agribusiness has poured into senatorial elections went straight to members of the Agricultural Committee and/or the related agricultural appropriations subcommittee.Read more on the breakdown of agribusiness’ political cash here.

As the farm bill heads to the floor, we noticed that all but two current senators have received cash from the agribusiness industry. And the agricultural world has spent their campaign cash quite strategically.

In fact, half of the $26 million agribusiness has poured into senatorial elections went straight to members of the Agricultural Committee and/or the related agricultural appropriations subcommittee.

Read more on the breakdown of agribusiness’ political cash here.

Posted 10 months ago
20 notes
Why does the IRS regulate political groups? A look at the complex world of campaign finance

Why does the IRS regulate political groups? A look at the complex world of campaign finance

Posted 11 months ago
5 notes
Policy stalls as campaign spending by fossil fuel industries and greenhouse gases rise to historic levels.
More: http://reporting.sunlightfoundation.com/2013/whats-wrong-picture-greenhouse-gas-all-time-high/

Policy stalls as campaign spending by fossil fuel industries and greenhouse gases rise to historic levels.

More: http://reporting.sunlightfoundation.com/2013/whats-wrong-picture-greenhouse-gas-all-time-high/

Posted 11 months ago
18 notes
Why did four key Democrats vote no on extending gun background checks?
Back in February, we at Sunlight made some predictions about the Democrats who would be most likely to oppose some tightening of gun laws, based on three factors: being up for a vote in 2014, having a high number of gun businesses in the state, and having a low Obama vote share.
Based on the data, we thought Sens. Max Baucus, Mark Begich, Tim Johnson and Mark Pryor were most likely to vote ‘no’ on reform. We got 3/4 correct.
More here.

Why did four key Democrats vote no on extending gun background checks?

Back in February, we at Sunlight made some predictions about the Democrats who would be most likely to oppose some tightening of gun laws, based on three factors: being up for a vote in 2014, having a high number of gun businesses in the state, and having a low Obama vote share.

Based on the data, we thought Sens. Max Baucus, Mark Begich, Tim Johnson and Mark Pryor were most likely to vote ‘no’ on reform. We got 3/4 correct.

More here.

Posted 1 year ago
6 notes