The Geography of Hate

Since 2000, the number of organized hate groups — from white  nationalists, neo-Nazis and racist skinheads to border vigilantes and  black separatist organizations — has climbed by more than 50 percent,  according to the Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC). Their rise has been  fueled by growing anxiety over jobs, immigration, racial and ethnic  diversity, the election of Barack Obama as America’s first black  president, and the lingering economic crisis. Most of them merely  espouse violent theories; some of them are stock-piling weapons and  actively planning attacks.

The Geography of Hate

Since 2000, the number of organized hate groups — from white nationalists, neo-Nazis and racist skinheads to border vigilantes and black separatist organizations — has climbed by more than 50 percent, according to the Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC). Their rise has been fueled by growing anxiety over jobs, immigration, racial and ethnic diversity, the election of Barack Obama as America’s first black president, and the lingering economic crisis. Most of them merely espouse violent theories; some of them are stock-piling weapons and actively planning attacks.

Posted 3 years ago
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