afrographique:

An infographic depicting the percentage share of formal firms that are owned by women in Africa. Data from the World Bank.

afrographique:

An infographic depicting the percentage share of formal firms that are owned by women in Africa. Data from the World Bank.

Reblogged 2 years ago from afrographique
1,016 notes
lemonsandkiwi:

“Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak took a drastic step before his ouster:  He tried to shut down his country’s Internet. In an effort to silence  critics, the Mubarak government took major Internet service providers  off-line. Data scientist Kovas Boguta created this graphic to show how  the cutoff and eventual restoration affected Twitter users in the Middle  East. Twitter is a social media service through which brief messages  can be relayed to thousands at once. Boguta’s sample consists of a  selection of Mideast Twitter users who included the keywords (called  hashtags) #Jan25 and #Tahrir in messages.”

lemonsandkiwi:

“Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak took a drastic step before his ouster: He tried to shut down his country’s Internet. In an effort to silence critics, the Mubarak government took major Internet service providers off-line. Data scientist Kovas Boguta created this graphic to show how the cutoff and eventual restoration affected Twitter users in the Middle East. Twitter is a social media service through which brief messages can be relayed to thousands at once. Boguta’s sample consists of a selection of Mideast Twitter users who included the keywords (called hashtags) #Jan25 and #Tahrir in messages.”

Reblogged 3 years ago from lemonsandkiwi-deactivated201207
8 notes
HarrasMap tracks reports of sexual harassment in Egypt.
The Next Web Middle East:

If you’ve ever been to Cairo, you’ll know that, as a woman, walking down the streets of the city, the chances that you’ll get harassed are sadly pretty high. I actually cringe writing that and there’s a part of me that doesn’t want to acknowledge it publicly. Whether it’s because as Middle Eastern women, we’ve been conditioned not to talk about it, or because it tarnishes the country’s image, I can’t tell. But that way of thinking is probably part of the inspiration behind the relatively new Cairo-based initiative, HarassMap.
[…]
The very act of reporting the incident is the first step in awareness, as Engy explains. “The main idea is to provide women with a platform where they can speak up, share their thoughts and experiences.”

HarrasMap tracks reports of sexual harassment in Egypt.

The Next Web Middle East:

If you’ve ever been to Cairo, you’ll know that, as a woman, walking down the streets of the city, the chances that you’ll get harassed are sadly pretty high. I actually cringe writing that and there’s a part of me that doesn’t want to acknowledge it publicly. Whether it’s because as Middle Eastern women, we’ve been conditioned not to talk about it, or because it tarnishes the country’s image, I can’t tell. But that way of thinking is probably part of the inspiration behind the relatively new Cairo-based initiative, HarassMap.

[…]

The very act of reporting the incident is the first step in awareness, as Engy explains. “The main idea is to provide women with a platform where they can speak up, share their thoughts and experiences.”

Posted 3 years ago
11 notes
Identifying Strategic Protest Routes for Civil Resistance: An Analysis of Optimal Approaches to Tahrir Square

Out of curiosity, Jessica began to wonder  whether the use of GIS data and spatial analysis might shed some light  on possible protest routes. She began her analysis by  identifying three  critical strategic elements for a successful protest route:
“1) Gathering points  where demonstrators initiate protests; 2) two types of routes—protest  collection areas of high population density through which protesters  walk to collect additional supporters and protest approach routes on  major streets that accommodate large groups that are more difficult to  disperse; and 3) convergence points where smaller groups of protester  merge to increase strength in order to approach the destination.”

Identifying Strategic Protest Routes for Civil Resistance: An Analysis of Optimal Approaches to Tahrir Square

Out of curiosity, Jessica began to wonder whether the use of GIS data and spatial analysis might shed some light on possible protest routes. She began her analysis by  identifying three critical strategic elements for a successful protest route:

“1) Gathering points where demonstrators initiate protests; 2) two types of routes—protest collection areas of high population density through which protesters walk to collect additional supporters and protest approach routes on major streets that accommodate large groups that are more difficult to disperse; and 3) convergence points where smaller groups of protester merge to increase strength in order to approach the destination.”

Posted 3 years ago
8 notes
curiositycounts:

The effects of political and civic unrest in Egypt and Libya on global oil prices, in an infographic timeline.

curiositycounts:

The effects of political and civic unrest in Egypt and Libya on global oil prices, in an infographic timeline.

Reblogged 3 years ago from curiositycounts
58 notes
Arab spring: an interactive timeline of Middle East protests 

Ever since a man in Tunisia burnt himself to death in December 2010 in protest at his treatment by police, pro-democracy rebellions have erupted across the Arab world. Our interactive timeline traces key events

Arab spring: an interactive timeline of Middle East protests

Ever since a man in Tunisia burnt himself to death in December 2010 in protest at his treatment by police, pro-democracy rebellions have erupted across the Arab world. Our interactive timeline traces key events

Posted 3 years ago
8 notes
halfspeed:

Infographic of the Day: An Internet Timeline of the Egyptian Uprising | Co.Design

halfspeed:

Infographic of the Day: An Internet Timeline of the Egyptian Uprising | Co.Design

Reblogged 3 years ago from halfspeed-deactivated20130117
3 notes
Crisis in Egypt

If you missed anything that happened during the Crisis in Egypt, from the events that started it until Mumbarak’s resignation from the Presidency, this Infographic from TakePart will help you recall all the important events and statistics in one easily digestible image. (via thenextweb.com)

Crisis in Egypt

If you missed anything that happened during the Crisis in Egypt, from the events that started it until Mumbarak’s resignation from the Presidency, this Infographic from TakePart will help you recall all the important events and statistics in one easily digestible image. (via thenextweb.com)

Posted 3 years ago
41 notes
Egypt Returns to the Internet

After a week long Internet outage following widespread social unrest and  political protest, Egyptian Internet traffic returned to near normal  levels this morning at approximately 5:30am EST.

Egypt Returns to the Internet

After a week long Internet outage following widespread social unrest and political protest, Egyptian Internet traffic returned to near normal levels this morning at approximately 5:30am EST.

Posted 3 years ago