Which Countries Pay Its Teachers What They’re Worth? 

Teachers have a tough job. They work long hours and don’t get paid much. But before this chart, I never realized this was an American phenomenon.

Which Countries Pay Its Teachers What They’re Worth?

Teachers have a tough job. They work long hours and don’t get paid much. But before this chart, I never realized this was an American phenomenon.

Posted 1 year ago
149 notes
Women as academic authors over the years

The Chronicle of Higher Education has a look at the percentage of academic papers published by women, over the past five centuries.

Women as academic authors over the years

The Chronicle of Higher Education has a look at the percentage of academic papers published by women, over the past five centuries.

Posted 1 year ago
14 notes
How the NSF allocates billions of federal dollars to top universities

As another college year begins, tens of thousands of academics will once again be scrambling to submit proposals to the National Science Foundation, hoping to secure government funding for their research. Each year, the National Science Foundation (NSF) bestows more than $7 billion worth of federal funding on about 12,000 research proposals, chosen out of about 45,000 submissions.
Thanks to the power of open data, we can now see how representation on NSF federal advisory committees connects to which universities get the most funding. (Federal advisory committee membership data is a feature of Influence Explorer.)

How the NSF allocates billions of federal dollars to top universities

As another college year begins, tens of thousands of academics will once again be scrambling to submit proposals to the National Science Foundation, hoping to secure government funding for their research. Each year, the National Science Foundation (NSF) bestows more than $7 billion worth of federal funding on about 12,000 research proposals, chosen out of about 45,000 submissions.

Thanks to the power of open data, we can now see how representation on NSF federal advisory committees connects to which universities get the most funding. (Federal advisory committee membership data is a feature of Influence Explorer.)

Posted 1 year ago
26 notes
Empty desks on National Mall represent high school drop-outs

As part of their campaign to prioritize education and get presidential candidates talking about it, the College Board setup 857 empty desks on the National Mall to represent the estimated number of high school drop-outs per hour.

Empty desks on National Mall represent high school drop-outs

As part of their campaign to prioritize education and get presidential candidates talking about it, the College Board setup 857 empty desks on the National Mall to represent the estimated number of high school drop-outs per hour.

Posted 1 year ago
27 notes
oneofthepaths:

An alternative approach to measuring national well-being.
GROSS DOMESTIC PRODUCT, better known by its initials, GDP, has been economists’ chosen measure of a nation’s well-being for over 70 years. But it has limitations; it takes no account of environmental degradation and excludes unpaid services such as volunteering and housework, for example. In the words of Bobby Kennedy, speaking in 1968, “it measures everything…except that which makes life worthwhile.” In an attempt to address these shortcomings the OECD, a mainly rich-country think-tank, has created the “Better-Life” index. Now in its second year, the index uses 24 variables (which include both hard data and survey data) across 11 sectors to create a measure of welfare for 34 of its member countries, plus Brazil and Russia. The Economist has grouped these 11 sectors into four broader categories. (via Daily chart: The wealth of nations | The Economist)

oneofthepaths:

An alternative approach to measuring national well-being.

GROSS DOMESTIC PRODUCT, better known by its initials, GDP, has been economists’ chosen measure of a nation’s well-being for over 70 years. But it has limitations; it takes no account of environmental degradation and excludes unpaid services such as volunteering and housework, for example. In the words of Bobby Kennedy, speaking in 1968, “it measures everything…except that which makes life worthwhile.” In an attempt to address these shortcomings the OECD, a mainly rich-country think-tank, has created the “Better-Life” index. Now in its second year, the index uses 24 variables (which include both hard data and survey data) across 11 sectors to create a measure of welfare for 34 of its member countries, plus Brazil and Russia. The Economist has grouped these 11 sectors into four broader categories. (via Daily chart: The wealth of nations | The Economist)

Reblogged 1 year ago from oneofthepaths
22 notes
ourtimeorg:

Only 31% of available jobs actually require a bachelor’s degree and many pundits are starting to question the value of college. Is a vocational degree a better investment? What do you think? LIKE this post and COMMENT below! 
For more translations, go to www.ourtime.org

ourtimeorg:

Only 31% of available jobs actually require a bachelor’s degree and many pundits are starting to question the value of college. Is a vocational degree a better investment? What do you think? LIKE this post and COMMENT below! 

For more translations, go to www.ourtime.org

Reblogged 1 year ago from ourtimeorg
227 notes
Growing Education Divide in Cities
College graduates are more unevenly distributed in the top 100 metropolitan areas now than they were four decades ago. More adults have bachelor’s degrees, but the difference between the most and least educated metro areas is double what it was in 1970.

Growing Education Divide in Cities

College graduates are more unevenly distributed in the top 100 metropolitan areas now than they were four decades ago. More adults have bachelor’s degrees, but the difference between the most and least educated metro areas is double what it was in 1970.
Posted 1 year ago
11 notes
John Moore: It’s the older generation that’s entitled, not students

Setting aside the fact that this intergenerational hectoring dates back to Socrates, let us ask: Who exactly is making the charge? Quebec has had low tuition rates for a half century. That means almost every living adult in the province, having already been afforded a plum goodie, is now wagging his finger at the first generation that will be asked to pay the tab. So who really is entitled here?

John Moore: It’s the older generation that’s entitled, not students

Setting aside the fact that this intergenerational hectoring dates back to Socrates, let us ask: Who exactly is making the charge? Quebec has had low tuition rates for a half century. That means almost every living adult in the province, having already been afforded a plum goodie, is now wagging his finger at the first generation that will be asked to pay the tab. So who really is entitled here?

Posted 1 year ago
200 notes
Student Debt at Colleges and Universities Across the Nation
The average amount of debt that students have at graduation has increased at a vast majority of colleges and universities in the United States, according to data compiled by an advocacy group, the Institute for College Access and Success. The data on student debt is self-reported by the schools, and many institutions don’t participate. Other figures, like graduation rates, come from the Education Department.
(h/t @hatchjt)

Student Debt at Colleges and Universities Across the Nation

The average amount of debt that students have at graduation has increased at a vast majority of colleges and universities in the United States, according to data compiled by an advocacy group, the Institute for College Access and Success. The data on student debt is self-reported by the schools, and many institutions don’t participate. Other figures, like graduation rates, come from the Education Department.

(h/t @hatchjt)

Posted 1 year ago
10 notes
The Value of America’s Forests: A Prize-Winning Map

Each year the National Geographic Society sponsors a number of cartography awards to support up-and-coming student map-makers. Today, I’d like to introduce you to Sarah Graves, a student at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, who won first prize in the Association of American Geographers-National Geographic Award in Mapping with her map, The Value of America’s Forests. Her prize: $900 and a National Geographic 9th Edition Atlas of the World. Sarah shared her map and a few reflections on her background and interest in maps and visualizations.

The Value of America’s Forests: A Prize-Winning Map

Each year the National Geographic Society sponsors a number of cartography awards to support up-and-coming student map-makers. Today, I’d like to introduce you to Sarah Graves, a student at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, who won first prize in the Association of American Geographers-National Geographic Award in Mapping with her map, The Value of America’s Forests. Her prize: $900 and a National Geographic 9th Edition Atlas of the World. Sarah shared her map and a few reflections on her background and interest in maps and visualizations.

Posted 2 years ago
93 notes
inspinesse:

Do College Freshmen Feel Academically Prepared for Classes?

inspinesse:

Do College Freshmen Feel Academically Prepared for Classes?

Reblogged 2 years ago from inspinesse
13 notes
datanouveau:

From Andrew Ryder’s dissertation, a clear diagram showing the attrition of GED students.

datanouveau:

From Andrew Ryder’s dissertation, a clear diagram showing the attrition of GED students.

Reblogged 2 years ago from datanouveau
3 notes
theatlantic:

Where Did All the Workers Go? 60 Years of Economic Change in 1 Graph

President Obama’s State of the Union speech was surprisingly bullish on reviving manufacturing, prompting one very clever person on Twitter to say something along the lines of: “Democrats want the economy of the 1950s, while Republicans just want to live there.”
It got me thinking: What did the economy look like in the 1950s? If you could organize all the jobs into buckets and compare the paper-shuffling professional services bucket to the manufacturing bucket, what would they look like around 1950, and how has the picture changed in the last 60 years? Read more.
[Image: Brian McGill and Peter Bell/National Journal]

theatlantic:

Where Did All the Workers Go? 60 Years of Economic Change in 1 Graph

President Obama’s State of the Union speech was surprisingly bullish on reviving manufacturing, prompting one very clever person on Twitter to say something along the lines of: “Democrats want the economy of the 1950s, while Republicans just want to live there.”

It got me thinking: What did the economy look like in the 1950s? If you could organize all the jobs into buckets and compare the paper-shuffling professional services bucket to the manufacturing bucket, what would they look like around 1950, and how has the picture changed in the last 60 years? Read more.

[Image: Brian McGill and Peter Bell/National Journal]

Reblogged 2 years ago from theatlantic
321 notes