jkrikis:

loop / oktober 2004 - september 2005 / asprovalta

jkrikis:

loop / oktober 2004 - september 2005 / asprovalta

Reblogged 1 year ago from jkrikis
7,669 notes
ffaruq:

Infographic of The Worlds Oldest Trees by Vienna-based graphic designer Michæl Paukner. The lines of this chart connect the world’s oldest trees to their geographical place of origin.

ffaruq:

Infographic of The Worlds Oldest Trees by Vienna-based graphic designer Michæl Paukner. The lines of this chart connect the world’s oldest trees to their geographical place of origin.

Reblogged 1 year ago from ffaruq
122 notes
toffeemilkshake:

Infoamazonia various data baked into 3 tile sets + overlay of point data for news stories etc.

toffeemilkshake:

Infoamazonia various data baked into 3 tile sets + overlay of point data for news stories etc.

Reblogged 1 year ago from toffeemilkshake
6 notes
Ocean Health Index

Evaluated globally and by country, these 10 public goals represent the wide range of benefits that a healthy ocean provides to people. Each country’s overall score is the average of its 10 goal scores. Overall scores and individual goal scores are directly comparable between all countries. All scores range from 0 to 100.

Ocean Health Index

Evaluated globally and by country, these 10 public goals represent the wide range of benefits that a healthy ocean provides to people. Each country’s overall score is the average of its 10 goal scores. Overall scores and individual goal scores are directly comparable between all countries. All scores range from 0 to 100.

Posted 2 years ago
10 notes
Hydrologic Maps Based on Coca-Cola Data Spark Concern over Water Grabs

As competition for clean water grows, some of the world’s biggest companies have joined forces to create unprecedented maps of the precious resource that flows beneath our feet.
The Aqueduct Alliance, which allows users to create maps by combining hydrological data with geographically specific details, gives companies and investors unprecedented detail of water availability in some of the world’s largest river basins.

Hydrologic Maps Based on Coca-Cola Data Spark Concern over Water Grabs

As competition for clean water grows, some of the world’s biggest companies have joined forces to create unprecedented maps of the precious resource that flows beneath our feet.

The Aqueduct Alliance, which allows users to create maps by combining hydrological data with geographically specific details, gives companies and investors unprecedented detail of water availability in some of the world’s largest river basins.

Posted 2 years ago
21 notes
Map of Life shows distribution of any species throughout the world

Ever wondered if a certain species of animal can be found where you live? The Map of Life website aims to answer this question. Built on a Google Maps platform, it lists virtually all of the vertebrate animals that can be found at any one point in the world.
Map of Life is currently accessible in a debut version, and is the result of a Yale University-led collaboration between several institutions and organizations.

Map of Life shows distribution of any species throughout the world

Ever wondered if a certain species of animal can be found where you live? The Map of Life website aims to answer this question. Built on a Google Maps platform, it lists virtually all of the vertebrate animals that can be found at any one point in the world.

Map of Life is currently accessible in a debut version, and is the result of a Yale University-led collaboration between several institutions and organizations.

Posted 2 years ago
10 notes
Planet Earth Has Less Water Than We Think!

As a child, you are told a lot of things about this great planet of ours. We are the third of nine planets in the Solar System (now eight and one dwarf planet), Mount Everest is the tallest mountain on the planet, and the Earth’s surface is 70% water. With a figure like that, it’s easy to assume that water is pretty much an infinite resource. However, according to the U. S. Geological Survey, if you were to take all of the water on the planet (including fresh water, sea water, ground water, water vapor and water inside our bodies), it would only make a sphere 860 miles in diameter. 860 miles!? You can drive that in a day – it’s about the distance from Salt Lake City to Topeka, Kansas.

Planet Earth Has Less Water Than We Think!

As a child, you are told a lot of things about this great planet of ours. We are the third of nine planets in the Solar System (now eight and one dwarf planet), Mount Everest is the tallest mountain on the planet, and the Earth’s surface is 70% water. With a figure like that, it’s easy to assume that water is pretty much an infinite resource. However, according to the U. S. Geological Survey, if you were to take all of the water on the planet (including fresh water, sea water, ground water, water vapor and water inside our bodies), it would only make a sphere 860 miles in diameter. 860 miles!? You can drive that in a day – it’s about the distance from Salt Lake City to Topeka, Kansas.

Posted 2 years ago
34 notes
areimage:

Great Garbage Patch

areimage:

Great Garbage Patch

Reblogged 2 years ago from areimages
112 notes
cartolleria:

Squirrel Highways
Nervous squirrels, afraid of an attack on the ground, use the phone and television cables as highways wherever the tree canopy’s broken. Birds rest on the power lines.  Image and caption copyrighted Denis Wood & Siglio Press reproduced with permission. (via Brain Pickings | Kirstin Butler)

cartolleria:

Squirrel Highways

Nervous squirrels, afraid of an attack on the ground, use the phone and television cables as highways wherever the tree canopy’s broken. Birds rest on the power lines. Image and caption copyrighted Denis Wood & Siglio Press reproduced with permission. (via Brain Pickings | Kirstin Butler)

Reblogged 2 years ago from feltron
181 notes
Where the Trees Are

Trees are one of Earth’s largest banks for storing the carbon that  gets emitted by natural processes and human activities. Forests cover  about 30 percent of the planet’s surface, and as much as 45 percent of  the carbon stored on land is tied up in forests.

Where the Trees Are

Trees are one of Earth’s largest banks for storing the carbon that gets emitted by natural processes and human activities. Forests cover about 30 percent of the planet’s surface, and as much as 45 percent of the carbon stored on land is tied up in forests.

Posted 2 years ago
110 notes
‘Ghosts’ haunt creatures on bay’s bottom

Under the murky waters of the York River, an eerie blur appeared  suddenly on Edward Hogge’s sonar, near where his 40-foot deadrise boat  sailed about a mile offshore on a cool December morning.
Hogge made a hard right turn. “I’m going back to get it,” he  said. He called out to his wife and first mate, Cheryl. “All right,  honey, get your gloves on. Get ready!” When the boat stopped, she tossed  a long rope lined with hooks overboard and yanked it. “It’s got  something! It’s heavy,” Cheryl Hogge said.

‘Ghosts’ haunt creatures on bay’s bottom

Under the murky waters of the York River, an eerie blur appeared suddenly on Edward Hogge’s sonar, near where his 40-foot deadrise boat sailed about a mile offshore on a cool December morning.

Hogge made a hard right turn. “I’m going back to get it,” he said. He called out to his wife and first mate, Cheryl. “All right, honey, get your gloves on. Get ready!” When the boat stopped, she tossed a long rope lined with hooks overboard and yanked it. “It’s got something! It’s heavy,” Cheryl Hogge said.

Posted 2 years ago
38 notes
Greenpeace, WWF and Friends of the Earth across the decades

As this year sees the 50th anniversary of WWF and the 40th anniversaries of Friends of the Earth and Greenpeace, this timeline charts the birth of environmental civil  society through the highs and lows of the three green groups

Greenpeace, WWF and Friends of the Earth across the decades

As this year sees the 50th anniversary of WWF and the 40th anniversaries of Friends of the Earth and Greenpeace, this timeline charts the birth of environmental civil society through the highs and lows of the three green groups

Posted 2 years ago
27 notes
kenyatta:

Research finds that Douglas fir trees are networked, communicate and share resources 

Graduate student Kevin Beiler has found that all trees in dry interior Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. glauca) forests are interconnected, with the largest, oldest trees serving as hubs, much like the hub of a spoked wheel, where younger trees establish within the mycorrhizal network of the old trees.
Through careful experimentation, recent graduate Francois Teste determined that survival of these establishing trees was greatly enhanced when they were linked into the network of the old trees. Through the use of stable isotope tracers, he and Amanda Schoonmaker, a recent undergraduate student in Forestry, found that increased survival was associated with below ground transfer of carbon, nitrogen and water from the old trees. 

via Abject

kenyatta:

Research finds that Douglas fir trees are networked, communicate and share resources 

Graduate student Kevin Beiler has found that all trees in dry interior Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. glauca) forests are interconnected, with the largest, oldest trees serving as hubs, much like the hub of a spoked wheel, where younger trees establish within the mycorrhizal network of the old trees.

Through careful experimentation, recent graduate Francois Teste determined that survival of these establishing trees was greatly enhanced when they were linked into the network of the old trees. Through the use of stable isotope tracers, he and Amanda Schoonmaker, a recent undergraduate student in Forestry, found that increased survival was associated with below ground transfer of carbon, nitrogen and water from the old trees. 

via Abject

Reblogged 3 years ago from kenyatta
1,003 notes
Almost Extinct

Every day, hundreds of endangered species get closer to extinction. By working together, we can help save them.
The BBC Wildlife fund works to raise funds and awareness to help threatened wildlife and places.

Almost Extinct

Every day, hundreds of endangered species get closer to extinction. By working together, we can help save them.

The BBC Wildlife fund works to raise funds and awareness to help threatened wildlife and places.

Posted 3 years ago
14 notes

Why you shouldn’t eat farmed fish – a graphical explanation

Do you know where your fish comes from? Well, yeah, it comes from the water, but there’s a little more to it than that. Nigel Upchurch, who previously explained the benefits of turning off your computer at night, describes in this short one-minute video why eating farmed fish isn’t the best idea. In short, while farming fish seems like a good solution to depleted wild supply, the process actually ends up using even more natural resources.