nationaljournal:

The Voices of the Drought

It’s HOT outside. But hey, you knew that. 52 percent of the U.S. is experiencing moderate to exceptional drought conditions. So what about the farmers, how are they handling the heat? We asked them. Hear how farmers, small-business owners and local governments are dealing with the heat.

View a history of droughts above and how Congress acted

I was in Texas last week where the yellow grass crunches under your feet and Austin’s Lake Travis is about 45 feet lower than it should be. -BdM

underpaidgenius:

The Drought Of 2011 just keeps getting worse:

Kim Severson and Kirk Johnson via
The pain has spread across 14 states, from Florida, where severe water  restrictions are in place, to Arizona, where ranchers could be forced to  sell off entire herds of cattle because they simply cannot feed them.
In Texas, where the drought is the worst, virtually no part of the state  has been untouched. City dwellers and ranchers have been tormented by  excessive heat and high winds. In the Southwest, wildfires are chewing  through millions of acres.
Last month, the United States Department of Agriculture designated all  254 counties in Texas natural disaster areas, qualifying them for  varying levels of federal relief. More than 30 percent of the state’s  wheat fields might be lost, adding pressure to a crop in short supply  globally.
Even if weather patterns shift and relief-giving rain comes, losses will  surely head past $3 billion in Texas alone, state agricultural  officials said.
Most troubling is that the drought, which could go down as one of the  nation’s worst, has come on extra hot and extra early. It has its roots  in 2010 and continued through the winter. The five months from this  February to June, for example, were so dry that they shattered a Texas  record set in 1917, said Don Conlee, the acting state climatologist.
Oklahoma has had only 28 percent of its normal summer rainfall, and the heat has blasted past 90 degrees for a month.
“We’ve had a two- or three-week start on what is likely to be a disastrous summer,” said Kevin Kloesel, director of the Oklahoma Climatological Survey.
The question, of course, becomes why. In a spring and summer in which weather news has been dominated by epic floods and tornadoes,  it is hard to imagine that more than a quarter of the country is facing  an equally daunting but very different kind of natural disaster.

And no end in sight.

underpaidgenius:

The Drought Of 2011 just keeps getting worse:

Kim Severson and Kirk Johnson via

The pain has spread across 14 states, from Florida, where severe water restrictions are in place, to Arizona, where ranchers could be forced to sell off entire herds of cattle because they simply cannot feed them.

In Texas, where the drought is the worst, virtually no part of the state has been untouched. City dwellers and ranchers have been tormented by excessive heat and high winds. In the Southwest, wildfires are chewing through millions of acres.

Last month, the United States Department of Agriculture designated all 254 counties in Texas natural disaster areas, qualifying them for varying levels of federal relief. More than 30 percent of the state’s wheat fields might be lost, adding pressure to a crop in short supply globally.

Even if weather patterns shift and relief-giving rain comes, losses will surely head past $3 billion in Texas alone, state agricultural officials said.

Most troubling is that the drought, which could go down as one of the nation’s worst, has come on extra hot and extra early. It has its roots in 2010 and continued through the winter. The five months from this February to June, for example, were so dry that they shattered a Texas record set in 1917, said Don Conlee, the acting state climatologist.

Oklahoma has had only 28 percent of its normal summer rainfall, and the heat has blasted past 90 degrees for a month.

“We’ve had a two- or three-week start on what is likely to be a disastrous summer,” said Kevin Kloesel, director of the Oklahoma Climatological Survey.

The question, of course, becomes why. In a spring and summer in which weather news has been dominated by epic floods and tornadoes, it is hard to imagine that more than a quarter of the country is facing an equally daunting but very different kind of natural disaster.

And no end in sight.

Reblogged 2 years ago from underpaidgenius
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