nickbaumann:

Map: Detroit’s racial divide, according to the 2000 census. Blue dots represent black people; red dots represent white people. The line along the north side of the city is 8-Mile Road.


NB: Original source seems to be via Wikipedia.

nickbaumann:

Map: Detroit’s racial divide, according to the 2000 census. Blue dots represent black people; red dots represent white people. The line along the north side of the city is 8-Mile Road.

NB: Original source seems to be via Wikipedia.

Reblogged 1 year ago from nickbaumann
69 notes
With so much space, so few options — Detroit’s vast vacant lots are a burden

If vacant lots were painted red, an aerial view of Detroit would look like a bad case of the measles. There is so much empty land today within Detroit’s 139 square miles — land slowly returning to nature with no buildings — the city of Paris could fit inside. If all that land were gathered into football fields, Detroit could host 25,000 simultaneous games.

With so much space, so few options — Detroit’s vast vacant lots are a burden

If vacant lots were painted red, an aerial view of Detroit would look like a bad case of the measles. There is so much empty land today within Detroit’s 139 square miles — land slowly returning to nature with no buildings — the city of Paris could fit inside. If all that land were gathered into football fields, Detroit could host 25,000 simultaneous games.

Posted 2 years ago
33 notes
The Forgetting Machine: Notes Toward a History of Detroit

The classic text on ruins is Edward Gibbon’s The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire,  completed during the last decades of the 18th century, when the English  were cultivating a special interest in historical empires that their  own advancing empire might yet surpass — a compensatory preoccupation  brought on by the recent loss of the American colonies. Toward the end  of his massive opus, Gibbon contemplates what it would have been like to  “discover” Rome in that late medieval moment when the great metropolis  was first appreciated as a ruin.

The Forgetting Machine: Notes Toward a History of Detroit

The classic text on ruins is Edward Gibbon’s The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, completed during the last decades of the 18th century, when the English were cultivating a special interest in historical empires that their own advancing empire might yet surpass — a compensatory preoccupation brought on by the recent loss of the American colonies. Toward the end of his massive opus, Gibbon contemplates what it would have been like to “discover” Rome in that late medieval moment when the great metropolis was first appreciated as a ruin.

Posted 2 years ago
15 notes