sunlightcities:

A fascinating use of data: 
"It looks a bit like an isochrone, a map showing how far you can travel on a transportation network in a given time frame, starting from a single location. But this map tells us something about every point of origin in the Minneapolis/St. Paul region simultaneously. Specifically, it tells us how many jobs are accessible within 30 minutes – using the key at right – from each location by public transit, during the 7-9 a.m. peak morning window. The darker green areas have the greatest accessibility to jobs; the lighter green areas have the least. The red lines show transit routes.” 
Read more at Atlantic Cities 

sunlightcities:

A fascinating use of data: 

"It looks a bit like an isochrone, a map showing how far you can travel on a transportation network in a given time frame, starting from a single location. But this map tells us something about every point of origin in the Minneapolis/St. Paul region simultaneously. Specifically, it tells us how many jobs are accessible within 30 minutes – using the key at right – from each location by public transit, during the 7-9 a.m. peak morning window. The darker green areas have the greatest accessibility to jobs; the lighter green areas have the least. The red lines show transit routes.” 

Read more at Atlantic Cities 

Reblogged 5 months ago from sunlightcities
83 notes

A New Tool for Comparing Cities

For the last fifty years Richard Wurman – architect, graphic designer and founder of the TED Conferences – has been dedicated to creating a platform that compares .  In Wurman’s early studies, he quickly learned that comparing global  was no easy task. use very different languages to describe their assets, from planning principles to land use types to social statistics. “They don’t collect their information the same way. They don’t describe themselves with the same legend,” he tells Nate Berg of Next City.

wbezdata:

Data Dive: Which comes first? Closed schools or blighted neighborhoods?
As Chicago closes public schools, a question arises: Do school closings contribute to a community’s downward spiral — or are they a symptom?

wbezdata:

Data Dive: Which comes first? Closed schools or blighted neighborhoods?

As Chicago closes public schools, a question arises: Do school closings contribute to a community’s downward spiral — or are they a symptom?

Reblogged 1 year ago from sunlightcities
25 notes
ViziCities development diary #1: One month in

Just over a month ago I announced ViziCities, the latest project from Pete Smart and myself. We’re not quite ready to release it yet but make sure you sign up for the beta to be the first to use it. In the meantime, let me fill you in on what we’ve been up to this past month.

ViziCities development diary #1: One month in

Just over a month ago I announced ViziCities, the latest project from Pete Smart and myself. We’re not quite ready to release it yet but make sure you sign up for the beta to be the first to use it. In the meantime, let me fill you in on what we’ve been up to this past month.

Posted 1 year ago
28 notes
Reblogged 1 year ago from humanscalecities
1,123 notes
sunlightcities:

As we started thinking about how to approach cities across the US, we had to think about where to focus our effort and attention. Should we focus on a few key, well-known cities who set the strongest examples of developing transparency and open data reforms? Should we narrow down the list to only the biggest, say, 10 cities, or break them into categories by size?
It turns out that most U.S. cities are far smaller than you might think. More than 80 percent of U.S. cities have fewer than 10,000 people. The scope and kinds of data housed in these cities might be vastly different from the data in a metropolis like Los Angeles, with its more than 3 million people in the city limits alone.

sunlightcities:

As we started thinking about how to approach cities across the US, we had to think about where to focus our effort and attention. Should we focus on a few key, well-known cities who set the strongest examples of developing transparency and open data reforms? Should we narrow down the list to only the biggest, say, 10 cities, or break them into categories by size?

It turns out that most U.S. cities are far smaller than you might think. More than 80 percent of U.S. cities have fewer than 10,000 people. The scope and kinds of data housed in these cities might be vastly different from the data in a metropolis like Los Angeles, with its more than 3 million people in the city limits alone.

Reblogged 1 year ago from sunlightcities
11 notes
18 New Ways of Visualizing A City
The way we visualize and compare cities says much about our understanding of how they work. As part of our ongoing exploration of “what makes a city,” we wanted to survey how people are using data to describe the political, geographical and social realities cities face.
This interactive visualization by Forbes uses IRS tax statistics to track inbound and outbound migration by county and year.

18 New Ways of Visualizing A City

The way we visualize and compare cities says much about our understanding of how they work. As part of our ongoing exploration of “what makes a city,” we wanted to survey how people are using data to describe the political, geographical and social realities cities face.
This interactive visualization by Forbes uses IRS tax statistics to track inbound and outbound migration by county and year.
Posted 1 year ago
19 notes
Visualization of the Week: Urban metabolism

This week’s visualization comes from PhD candidates David Quinn and Daniel Wiesmann, who’ve built an interactive web-mapping tool that lets you explore the “urban metabolism” of major U.S. cities. The map includes data about cities’ and neighborhoods’ energy usage (kilowatt per hour per person) and material intensity (kilo per person) patterns. You can also view population density.

Visualization of the Week: Urban metabolism

This week’s visualization comes from PhD candidates David Quinn and Daniel Wiesmann, who’ve built an interactive web-mapping tool that lets you explore the “urban metabolism” of major U.S. cities. The map includes data about cities’ and neighborhoods’ energy usage (kilowatt per hour per person) and material intensity (kilo per person) patterns. You can also view population density.

Posted 2 years ago
42 notes
thewonk:

This is an amazing advance. A smart phone app that will use people’s everyday movements and activities to track how people use cities (via Hacking the city for a greener future - CNN.com).

thewonk:

This is an amazing advance. A smart phone app that will use people’s everyday movements and activities to track how people use cities (via Hacking the city for a greener future - CNN.com).

Reblogged 2 years ago from michaelmenelli
23 notes
Planning Cities for People

ClimateWorks is a San Francisco based foundation whose mission is to  support public policies that prevent dangerous climate change and  promote global prosperity. This document, Planning Cities for People,  was prepared for the Chinese government and contains 8 research-based  recommendations that lead to prosperous, low-carbon urban areas. The  document uses richly illustrated maps and diagrams to present examples  of street-grids that promote walking, prioritize bicycle networks,  create mixed-use neighborhoods and support high-quality transit

Planning Cities for People

ClimateWorks is a San Francisco based foundation whose mission is to support public policies that prevent dangerous climate change and promote global prosperity. This document, Planning Cities for People, was prepared for the Chinese government and contains 8 research-based recommendations that lead to prosperous, low-carbon urban areas. The document uses richly illustrated maps and diagrams to present examples of street-grids that promote walking, prioritize bicycle networks, create mixed-use neighborhoods and support high-quality transit

Posted 2 years ago
480 notes

The Urban Monitoring System: CCTV Draped on 3D Models

An Urban Sensation is a proposal from Dan Foster-Smith, a graduate from Designing Interactions at the Royal College of Arts. It is aimed at developing an open source infrastructure that would enable the virtual reconstruction of our sensory stimuli at any location. The infrastructure enables our sense of sight, sound and smell to be emulated. For the sense of sight live CCTV footage is overlain on a 3D model of the urban environment.

secretrepublic:

Visualizing density of international cities.
renascens:

Visualizing New York’s Density
How does New York City compare with the burgeoning supercities of the developing world?
Two interesting data visualizations from the new book “Living in the Endless City,” which examines the future of urban life, help put the largest U.S. city in perspective against its global counterparts. By 2050, the project notes, 75% of the world’s population is projected to live in cities, up from 53% today.
As crowded as conditions might feel during rush hour in Manhattan, the graphic below shows that populations in other cities — in particular Istanbul and Mumbai — are more densely packed. The most dense neighborhood in New York, the Upper East Side, houses only half as many people per square kilometer as Mumbai’s most crowded district does.
Likewise, a look at urban age distribution shows that the population of developed cities like New York and London may be younger than their surrounding rural areas, but is still far older than fast-growing cities in the developing world. Click here to take a closer look at the age breakdown.
Source: City Breaths

secretrepublic:

Visualizing density of international cities.

renascens:

Visualizing New York’s Density

How does New York City compare with the burgeoning supercities of the developing world?

Two interesting data visualizations from the new book “Living in the Endless City,” which examines the future of urban life, help put the largest U.S. city in perspective against its global counterparts. By 2050, the project notes, 75% of the world’s population is projected to live in cities, up from 53% today.

As crowded as conditions might feel during rush hour in Manhattan, the graphic below shows that populations in other cities — in particular Istanbul and Mumbai — are more densely packed. The most dense neighborhood in New York, the Upper East Side, houses only half as many people per square kilometer as Mumbai’s most crowded district does.

Likewise, a look at urban age distribution shows that the population of developed cities like New York and London may be younger than their surrounding rural areas, but is still far older than fast-growing cities in the developing world. Click here to take a closer look at the age breakdown.

Source: City Breaths

Reblogged 3 years ago from secretrepublic
100 notes