ilovecharts:

How Old Is Your Government?
Respect your elders?

ilovecharts:

How Old Is Your Government?

Respect your elders?

Reblogged 2 years ago from ilovecharts
182 notes
Romney surging, but Obama well ahead in campaign cash

For Mitt Romney, the magic number is $158 million. That’s how much he’ll have to outraise President Barack Obama over the last four months of the campaign to surpass the president, the record holder for campaign fundraising.
Obama’s advantage has been lost in media reports highighting the Republican nominee’s $106 million June haul. Even Obama’s campaign, including the president himself, has downplayed its financial advantage when it warns of being outspent by Romney and the Republican National Committee. For that to happen, Romney would have to best Obama by $39.5 million a month for each of the last four months of the campaign, which is $5 million more than the advantage Romney had in June.
An analysis of Federal Election Commission (FEC) disclosure reports starting when Obama and Romney formally disclosed their candidacies running through the end of May 2012, and adding in totals the campaigns have announced for June, shows that Obama and his affiliated groups have raised $552.5 million, compared to Romney’s $394.9 million.

Romney surging, but Obama well ahead in campaign cash

For Mitt Romney, the magic number is $158 million. That’s how much he’ll have to outraise President Barack Obama over the last four months of the campaign to surpass the president, the record holder for campaign fundraising.

Obama’s advantage has been lost in media reports highighting the Republican nominee’s $106 million June haul. Even Obama’s campaign, including the president himself, has downplayed its financial advantage when it warns of being outspent by Romney and the Republican National Committee. For that to happen, Romney would have to best Obama by $39.5 million a month for each of the last four months of the campaign, which is $5 million more than the advantage Romney had in June.

An analysis of Federal Election Commission (FEC) disclosure reports starting when Obama and Romney formally disclosed their candidacies running through the end of May 2012, and adding in totals the campaigns have announced for June, shows that Obama and his affiliated groups have raised $552.5 million, compared to Romney’s $394.9 million.

Posted 2 years ago
6 notes
journo-geekery:

22 Million Americans Are Unemployed Or Can’t Find Full-Time Work : Planet Money : NPR
Nice chart.

journo-geekery:

22 Million Americans Are Unemployed Or Can’t Find Full-Time Work : Planet Money : NPR

Nice chart.

Reblogged 2 years ago from journo-geekery
218 notes
underpaidgenius:

This time it’s different:

Still Crawling Out of a Very Deep Hole By Teresa Tritch
What distinguishes this jobs recovery from others is the sheer scale of the job loss that preceded it. The economy has regained 3.6 million jobs since employment hit bottom in February 2010, but it is still missing nearly 10 million jobs — 5.2 million lost in the recession and 4.7 million needed to employ new entrants to the labor market. The Economic Policy Institute estimates that at the average rate of job creation in the last three months, it would take until the end of 2017, fully 10 years from the start of the Great Recession in December 2007, to return to the prerecession jobless rate of 5 percent.
And there is no guarantee we will ever get there. It took about four years to close the job gaps created by the recessions that began in mid-1981 and mid-1990. In the tepid expansion after the 2001 recession, the job gap had still not closed by 2007.

Perhaps it’s a depression, not a recession?

underpaidgenius:

This time it’s different:

Still Crawling Out of a Very Deep Hole By Teresa Tritch

What distinguishes this jobs recovery from others is the sheer scale of the job loss that preceded it. The economy has regained 3.6 million jobs since employment hit bottom in February 2010, but it is still missing nearly 10 million jobs — 5.2 million lost in the recession and 4.7 million needed to employ new entrants to the labor market. The Economic Policy Institute estimates that at the average rate of job creation in the last three months, it would take until the end of 2017, fully 10 years from the start of the Great Recession in December 2007, to return to the prerecession jobless rate of 5 percent.

And there is no guarantee we will ever get there. It took about four years to close the job gaps created by the recessions that began in mid-1981 and mid-1990. In the tepid expansion after the 2001 recession, the job gap had still not closed by 2007.

Perhaps it’s a depression, not a recession?

Reblogged 2 years ago from underpaidgenius
48 notes
losangeleseconomy:

Here is a look at how Greater Los Angeles Area residents, business owners, and students view their region’s economy.
Do you have an opinion about what really matters for California’s economic future? Vote now!

losangeleseconomy:

Here is a look at how Greater Los Angeles Area residents, business owners, and students view their region’s economy.

Do you have an opinion about what really matters for California’s economic future? Vote now!

Reblogged 2 years ago from latimes
22 notes
theatlantic:

The Very Real Economic Dangers of an Aging America

In the future, U.S. growth will be slower. Recessions will be deeper. Recoveries will be weaker. And there’s exactly one thing to blame.
Demographics.
That’s the stark conclusion from James Stock and Mark Watson in this fascinating, and occasionally depressing, new paper. In fact, they say, the future is now. For the last few years, we’ve weathered the beginning of what demographers have called the grey tsunami. “Most of the slow recovery [in today’s job market] is attributable to a long-term slowdown in trend employment growth,” Stock and Watson write.
The authors blame two demographic demons for our uncertain future: (1) the plateau in the female labor force participation rate, and (2) the aging of the U.S. workforce. Their underlying logic is that without continued growth in female workers or a significant boost in population, employment and GDP growth will slow, leaving us vulnerable to recessions with “steeper declines and slower recoveries.” In such a future, jobless recoveries will be the only recoveries we know.
Read more. [Image: Peter Bell, Ryan Morris]

theatlantic:

The Very Real Economic Dangers of an Aging America

In the future, U.S. growth will be slower. Recessions will be deeper. Recoveries will be weaker. And there’s exactly one thing to blame.

Demographics.

That’s the stark conclusion from James Stock and Mark Watson in this fascinating, and occasionally depressing, new paper. In fact, they say, the future is now. For the last few years, we’ve weathered the beginning of what demographers have called the grey tsunami. “Most of the slow recovery [in today’s job market] is attributable to a long-term slowdown in trend employment growth,” Stock and Watson write.

The authors blame two demographic demons for our uncertain future: (1) the plateau in the female labor force participation rate, and (2) the aging of the U.S. workforce. Their underlying logic is that without continued growth in female workers or a significant boost in population, employment and GDP growth will slow, leaving us vulnerable to recessions with “steeper declines and slower recoveries.” In such a future, jobless recoveries will be the only recoveries we know.

Read more. [Image: Peter Bell, Ryan Morris]

Reblogged 2 years ago from theatlantic
146 notes
soupsoup:
Apple Is Now Bigger Than The Entire US Retail Sector

soupsoup:

Apple Is Now Bigger Than The Entire US Retail Sector
Reblogged 2 years ago from soupsoup
287 notes
futurejournalismproject:

Visualizing Books
The Book Genome Project explores the internal “DNA” of books much in the same way Pandora launched the Music Genome Project to explore the internal workings of a song.
Shown here is a visualization A Year and a Day by Virginia Henley, a novel that takes place in medieval Scotland (think Braveheart) and tells the story of a romance between a conquering warrior and a woman whose castle he invades.
Via Booklamp:

A book isn’t a flat, two-dimensional thing, so book summary statistics – such as that a book is 17% about Vampires – only partially represents what a book is about. Any reader will tell you that a book has ebbs and flows, like currents in a river. Like a Thematic Current. And visualizing it can be interesting…
…As you can see, the thematic currents [in A Year and a Day] deal heavily with ancient or medieval setting, strong romance, family (much of the story deals with having heirs), and warfare. More specifically, you can see where major battles occur, where major romantic engagements occur, and where pain and suffering occurs during and after combat.

Image: Detail from Visualizing the Thematic Flow of a Book. Via Booklamp.org.
H/T: Chart Porn.

futurejournalismproject:

Visualizing Books

The Book Genome Project explores the internal “DNA” of books much in the same way Pandora launched the Music Genome Project to explore the internal workings of a song.

Shown here is a visualization A Year and a Day by Virginia Henley, a novel that takes place in medieval Scotland (think Braveheart) and tells the story of a romance between a conquering warrior and a woman whose castle he invades.

Via Booklamp:

A book isn’t a flat, two-dimensional thing, so book summary statistics – such as that a book is 17% about Vampires – only partially represents what a book is about. Any reader will tell you that a book has ebbs and flows, like currents in a river. Like a Thematic Current. And visualizing it can be interesting…

…As you can see, the thematic currents [in A Year and a Day] deal heavily with ancient or medieval setting, strong romance, family (much of the story deals with having heirs), and warfare. More specifically, you can see where major battles occur, where major romantic engagements occur, and where pain and suffering occurs during and after combat.

Image: Detail from Visualizing the Thematic Flow of a Book. Via Booklamp.org.

H/T: Chart Porn.

Reblogged 2 years ago from futurejournalismproject
25 notes
ilovecharts:

The top 1% captured 93% of the income gains in the first year of recovery

ilovecharts:

The top 1% captured 93% of the income gains in the first year of recovery

Reblogged 2 years ago from ilovecharts
131 notes
ilovecharts:

Women in Publication: The 2011 Count

This week, VIDA: Women In Literary Arts, a website which “seeks to explore critical and cultural perceptions of writing by women through meaningful conversation and the exchange of ideas among existing and emerging literary communities,” released their annual comparison of publican and review of male and female writers in major literary outlets. The results are disappointing, though unsurprising. The only publication included to publish in almost equal measure was Granta, while others, including The Atlantic,The Paris Review, Harpers and The New Yorker were closer to a 75/25 split in favor of the men.
See all their results after the jump.

via picaresquity

ilovecharts:

Women in Publication: The 2011 Count

This week, VIDA: Women In Literary Arts, a website which “seeks to explore critical and cultural perceptions of writing by women through meaningful conversation and the exchange of ideas among existing and emerging literary communities,” released their annual comparison of publican and review of male and female writers in major literary outlets. The results are disappointing, though unsurprising. The only publication included to publish in almost equal measure was Granta, while others, including The Atlantic,The Paris ReviewHarpers and The New Yorker were closer to a 75/25 split in favor of the men.

See all their results after the jump.

via picaresquity

Reblogged 2 years ago from ilovecharts
363 notes