maschup:

HERE AT HOME

maschup:

HERE AT HOME

Reblogged 1 year ago from maschup
7 notes
Canada remapped as 14 provinces of (more or less) equal populations 

Last week, the U.S. political blogosphere was abuzz over a map that solved the inequities of the Electoral College system (and those of the U.S. Senate) by dividing the country into 50 states of equal population. The compiler, Neil Freeman, had some fun with it - people from Austin, after his reform, would hail from the great state of Big Thicket. (Which is in some ways no stranger than people from Seattle having to endlessly specify “Washington State,” but never mind.)

Canada remapped as 14 provinces of (more or less) equal populations

Last week, the U.S. political blogosphere was abuzz over a map that solved the inequities of the Electoral College system (and those of the U.S. Senate) by dividing the country into 50 states of equal population. The compiler, Neil Freeman, had some fun with it - people from Austin, after his reform, would hail from the great state of Big Thicket. (Which is in some ways no stranger than people from Seattle having to endlessly specify “Washington State,” but never mind.)

Posted 1 year ago
22 notes
 Google Maps shows how we spent summer 2012

In the blink of an eye, summer is coming to an end. It feels like it was just yesterday that I was planning out all my summer activities as I eagerly awaited the start of long, sunny days and warm nights. Before we approach the official end of summer on September 21, our Google Maps team thought it’d be fun to see how those of us in the Northern Hemisphere have spent the dog days. To do this, we reviewed the summer search activity on maps.google.com in several countries between the end of May and the beginning of September. Within each country, a look at some of the top-rising searches and the often-searched landmarks on Google Maps gives us a sense of how people around the world spent their summers.

Google Maps shows how we spent summer 2012

In the blink of an eye, summer is coming to an end. It feels like it was just yesterday that I was planning out all my summer activities as I eagerly awaited the start of long, sunny days and warm nights.

Before we approach the official end of summer on September 21, our Google Maps team thought it’d be fun to see how those of us in the Northern Hemisphere have spent the dog days. To do this, we reviewed the summer search activity on maps.google.com in several countries between the end of May and the beginning of September. Within each country, a look at some of the top-rising searches and the often-searched landmarks on Google Maps gives us a sense of how people around the world spent their summers.

Posted 2 years ago
11 notes
ilovecharts:

How Old Is Your Government?
Respect your elders?

ilovecharts:

How Old Is Your Government?

Respect your elders?

Reblogged 2 years ago from ilovecharts
182 notes
Graphic: A woman’s place in the world, ranked from first to last

Canada ranked 17th on a list of the best and worst places to be a woman in the world. In the report, researchers from Save the Children looked at the health, education and economic status of women in 165 countries to develop the ranking, with Norway claiming the top spot and Somalia the bottom. The National Post graphics department analyzes the data.

Graphic: A woman’s place in the world, ranked from first to last

Canada ranked 17th on a list of the best and worst places to be a woman in the world. In the report, researchers from Save the Children looked at the health, education and economic status of women in 165 countries to develop the ranking, with Norway claiming the top spot and Somalia the bottom. The National Post graphics department analyzes the data.

Posted 2 years ago
131 notes
moriandyama:

It’s up! A Comparative Timeline of International Gay and Lesbian Legislation. It compares the current 10 countries that have legalized gay marriage nationwide, the USA, Great Britain, and Brazil. Obviously there are a lot of countries missing from the list but I had less than a month to do this… So….
The finished version of the last post’s work in progress is now finished and online at DiversityCentral.com. Click through for full version and all the accompanying footnotes and sources.
Usually I just act as a “social media” intern, really just a strategic position since I’m not actually learned in marketing or anything, but I took it on as a kind of voluntary learning experience. This past month I was asked if I was interested in doing their short monthly statistics piece which is usually handled by an editorial intern.
We decided ahead of time that it would be something related to international LGBT facts. Rather than doing the usual short text collection of percentages I decided that it would be more interesting to do something more visual, which I find to be more immediately impactful. And there you have it.
Anyway, I won’t go too into it since technically this is meant for Diversity Central. Go ahead and go to the links to see the footnotes corresponding to each number and learn more if you want. I will also be writing a more in-depth blog post for them about it so I’ll link that when it’s done. 
… Also this is pretty much my first “professional” (if even) data visualization so feedback is appreciated. I’m not completely happy with how complicated the partial legislation stuff looks when it’s all overlapping and stuff but maybe it just reflects how complicated legislation gets in certain countries.

moriandyama:

It’s up! A Comparative Timeline of International Gay and Lesbian Legislation. It compares the current 10 countries that have legalized gay marriage nationwide, the USA, Great Britain, and Brazil. Obviously there are a lot of countries missing from the list but I had less than a month to do this… So….

The finished version of the last post’s work in progress is now finished and online at DiversityCentral.com. Click through for full version and all the accompanying footnotes and sources.

Usually I just act as a “social media” intern, really just a strategic position since I’m not actually learned in marketing or anything, but I took it on as a kind of voluntary learning experience. This past month I was asked if I was interested in doing their short monthly statistics piece which is usually handled by an editorial intern.

We decided ahead of time that it would be something related to international LGBT facts. Rather than doing the usual short text collection of percentages I decided that it would be more interesting to do something more visual, which I find to be more immediately impactful. And there you have it.

Anyway, I won’t go too into it since technically this is meant for Diversity Central. Go ahead and go to the links to see the footnotes corresponding to each number and learn more if you want. I will also be writing a more in-depth blog post for them about it so I’ll link that when it’s done. 

… Also this is pretty much my first “professional” (if even) data visualization so feedback is appreciated. I’m not completely happy with how complicated the partial legislation stuff looks when it’s all overlapping and stuff but maybe it just reflects how complicated legislation gets in certain countries.

Reblogged 2 years ago from moriandyama
17 notes
John Moore: It’s the older generation that’s entitled, not students

Setting aside the fact that this intergenerational hectoring dates back to Socrates, let us ask: Who exactly is making the charge? Quebec has had low tuition rates for a half century. That means almost every living adult in the province, having already been afforded a plum goodie, is now wagging his finger at the first generation that will be asked to pay the tab. So who really is entitled here?

John Moore: It’s the older generation that’s entitled, not students

Setting aside the fact that this intergenerational hectoring dates back to Socrates, let us ask: Who exactly is making the charge? Quebec has had low tuition rates for a half century. That means almost every living adult in the province, having already been afforded a plum goodie, is now wagging his finger at the first generation that will be asked to pay the tab. So who really is entitled here?

Posted 2 years ago
201 notes
 Rethinking immigration: The case for the 400,000 solution

Canada is facing a demographic crunch and labour shortage that will hinder our future prosperity. The solution: More economic immigrants who are selected for their skills. Scroll through the interactive below to delve into the challenges of immigration and possible fixes. Hear from immigrants and innovators. Share your own immigration story and see what immigration looks like in your community according to the latest available census data

Rethinking immigration: The case for the 400,000 solution

Canada is facing a demographic crunch and labour shortage that will hinder our future prosperity. The solution: More economic immigrants who are selected for their skills. Scroll through the interactive below to delve into the challenges of immigration and possible fixes. Hear from immigrants and innovators. Share your own immigration story and see what immigration looks like in your community according to the latest available census data

Posted 2 years ago
5 notes
nationalpost:

Building Toronto’s $2.6-billion subway extension
Who says Toronto isn’t building subways? In 2008, the TTC began design and construction for six new subway stations, linking the subway to growing York University and beyond. Snaking northwest, this line brings the subway for the first time outside Toronto’s boundary into the 905. The $2.6-billion project involves hundreds of workers. The TTC vows to open the extension at the end of 2015

nationalpost:

Building Toronto’s $2.6-billion subway extension

Who says Toronto isn’t building subways? In 2008, the TTC began design and construction for six new subway stations, linking the subway to growing York University and beyond. Snaking northwest, this line brings the subway for the first time outside Toronto’s boundary into the 905. The $2.6-billion project involves hundreds of workers. The TTC vows to open the extension at the end of 2015

Reblogged 2 years ago from nationalpost
33 notes
Reblogged 2 years ago from nationalpost
44 notes
nationalpost:

Everything you ever wanted to know about the late, lamented pennyLast week, when the federal budget was released, the government announced it would be discontinuing the penny. The National Post‘s Graphics department takes a look at what actually went into our smallest denomination coin. 

nationalpost:

Everything you ever wanted to know about the late, lamented penny
Last week, when the federal budget was released, the government announced it would be discontinuing the penny. The National Post‘s Graphics department takes a look at what actually went into our smallest denomination coin. 

Reblogged 2 years ago from nationalpost
110 notes
databureau:

Infographic: Your 2012 federal budget explained
Use this infographic to explore the revenue, expenses, proposals and projections from the budget.

databureau:

Infographic: Your 2012 federal budget explained

Use this infographic to explore the revenue, expenses, proposals and projections from the budget.

Reblogged 2 years ago from databureau
9 notes
datavis:

Canada’s Criminals: Ten provinces, 262,616 Crimes

datavis:

Canada’s Criminals: Ten provinces, 262,616 Crimes

Reblogged 2 years ago from datavis
26 notes