From the Sunlight blog: 
While MLB players will be taking the field for Sunday’s and Monday’s opening day games in hopes of winning a World Series title in October, team owners may have their sights set on winning a different sort of Fall Classic.
According to data from Sunlight’s Influence Explorer, MLB organizations pumped in over $24 million to politicians, PACs and independent expenditure groups throughout the 2012 election cycle. 

From the Sunlight blog

While MLB players will be taking the field for Sunday’s and Monday’s opening day games in hopes of winning a World Series title in October, team owners may have their sights set on winning a different sort of Fall Classic.

According to data from Sunlight’s Influence Explorer, MLB organizations pumped in over $24 million to politicians, PACs and independent expenditure groups throughout the 2012 election cycle. 

Posted 1 year ago
46 notes
What would happen if you tried to hit a baseball pitched at 90% the speed of light?

The answer turns out to be “a lot of things”, and they all happen very quickly, and it doesn’t end well for the batter (or the pitcher). I sat down with some physics books, a Nolan Ryan action figure, and a bunch of videotapes of nuclear tests and tried to sort it all out. What follows is my best guess at a nanosecond-by-nanosecond portrait:
The ball is going so fast that everything else is practically stationary. Even the molecules in the air are stationary. Air molecules vibrate back and forth at a few hundred miles per hour, but the ball is moving through them at 600 million miles per hour. This means that as far as the ball is concerned, they’re just hanging there, frozen.

What would happen if you tried to hit a baseball pitched at 90% the speed of light?

The answer turns out to be “a lot of things”, and they all happen very quickly, and it doesn’t end well for the batter (or the pitcher). I sat down with some physics books, a Nolan Ryan action figure, and a bunch of videotapes of nuclear tests and tried to sort it all out. What follows is my best guess at a nanosecond-by-nanosecond portrait:

The ball is going so fast that everything else is practically stationary. Even the molecules in the air are stationary. Air molecules vibrate back and forth at a few hundred miles per hour, but the ball is moving through them at 600 million miles per hour. This means that as far as the ball is concerned, they’re just hanging there, frozen.

Posted 2 years ago
23 notes
fastcodesign:

From the guys at Pop Chart Lab: Over 45 of the greatest moments in Yankee Stadium

fastcodesign:

From the guys at Pop Chart Lab: Over 45 of the greatest moments in Yankee Stadium

Reblogged 2 years ago from fastcodesign
18 notes
erikmal:

The Beatles and baseball, from the always excellent Craig Robinson.

erikmal:

The Beatles and baseball, from the always excellent Craig Robinson.

Reblogged 2 years ago from erikmal
18 notes
chaffandgrain:

From Slate:

Craig Robinson will change the way you look at baseball. In his new book Flip Flop Fly Ball and his website of the same name, Robinson has created a series of fun, charming, informative infographics on subjects ranging from the prevalence of baseball surnames to CC Sabathia’s weight. The following excerpts, all taken from Robinson’s book, are perfect examples of the breadth of his imagination and his knack for information design—never again will you think of team nicknames in the same way.

chaffandgrain:

From Slate:

Craig Robinson will change the way you look at baseball. In his new book Flip Flop Fly Ball and his website of the same name, Robinson has created a series of fun, charming, informative infographics on subjects ranging from the prevalence of baseball surnames to CC Sabathia’s weight. The following excerpts, all taken from Robinson’s book, are perfect examples of the breadth of his imagination and his knack for information design—never again will you think of team nicknames in the same way.

Reblogged 3 years ago from chaffandgrain
15 notes
infojocks:

Seeing the great work The Sports Design Blog has been doing with team colors has inspired me to get off my butt and finish a similar project I’ve been working on. More to come.

infojocks:

Seeing the great work The Sports Design Blog has been doing with team colors has inspired me to get off my butt and finish a similar project I’ve been working on. More to come.

Reblogged 3 years ago from takeoutarcade
222 notes
No-hit Dominance & Futility since 1962

Every time a no-hitter is thrown a little piece of every Mets fan  dies. Why? Because since coming into existence in 1962, no Mets pitcher  has ever thrown a no-hitter—at least, not while they wore a Mets  uniform.

No-hit Dominance & Futility since 1962

Every time a no-hitter is thrown a little piece of every Mets fan dies. Why? Because since coming into existence in 1962, no Mets pitcher has ever thrown a no-hitter—at least, not while they wore a Mets uniform.

Posted 3 years ago
9 notes