Cold war caliphate

Syrians kill each other in the thousands. Iran is reeling from economic sanctions. Israeli diplomats are bombed in New Delhi. Oil prices spike despite surplus supply. Dozens of events across West Asia and the world are manifestations of an increasingly desperate struggle for mastery of the Muslim world.
West Asia has split into two large opposing camps. The division is outwardly Shia versus Sunni, but covertly it is about the geopolitical interests of three large Muslim countries — Iran, Turkey and Saudi Arabia.
But these great games are being played on a rapidly changing and unpredictable West Asian landscape. The most important shift has been the Arab Spring and the entry of new centres of power like Egypt. Another is a belief that the United States is starting to keep a distance from the region and that countries like India and China may seek greater involvement.
Syrians kill each other in the thousands. Iran is reeling from economic sanctions. Israeli diplomats are bombed in New Delhi. Oil prices spike despite surplus supply. Dozens of events across West Asia and the world are manifestations of an increasingly desperate struggle for mastery of the Muslim world.

West Asia has split into two large opposing camps. The division is outwardly Shia versus Sunni, but covertly it is about the geopolitical interests of three large Muslim countries — Iran, Turkey and Saudi Arabia.

But these great games are being played on a rapidly changing and unpredictable West Asian landscape. The most important shift has been the Arab Spring and the entry of new centres of power like Egypt. Another is a belief that the United States is starting to keep a distance from the region and that countries like India and China may seek greater involvement.
Posted 1 year ago
13 notes
Syria: Mapping the insurgency

Few international journalists are present and conditions are difficult and dangerous. Reports of violence often comes via accounts posted on social networking sites, accompanied by grainy camera phone footage.
But based on detailed analysis of rebel and regime activity since October 2011, a map showing an assessment of the general situation on the ground has been produced by Washington-based think tank the Institute for the Study of War (ISW).

Syria: Mapping the insurgency

Few international journalists are present and conditions are difficult and dangerous. Reports of violence often comes via accounts posted on social networking sites, accompanied by grainy camera phone footage.

But based on detailed analysis of rebel and regime activity since October 2011, a map showing an assessment of the general situation on the ground has been produced by Washington-based think tank the Institute for the Study of War (ISW).

Posted 1 year ago
46 notes
futurejournalismproject:

Syrian Death Map
Via the Guardian:

The conflict in Syria continues to claim lives, over a year since the war started - especially in west of the country. This map, created for us by the team at CartoDB, uses data from Syrian Shuhada - also used by the UN - and each circle represents the number of people who died each day. The play button starts the calendar of deaths, which can be paused at any point

Via CartoDB

One of these online activists involved in “the media war” is curating a casualties database based on information from several websites that have already documented killings or casualties from direct sources. The “Syrian Revolution Martyr Database” (www.SyrianShuhada.com) currently collects detailed info and links to 22.601 deaths since March, 2011…
…The Vizzuality team worked on the visualization. The map is powered by CartoDB to manage and serve the timeseries data and uses d3.js for the animated datapoints and graph.
The man behind the Syrian Suhada database —who did not share his personal information— launched the project in early May 2011. He designed the website and back-end database, and populated it initially with the first available data on casualties. Currently a team of 2 curate the data contained on the site

Image: Screenshot, Syria conflict: a year of deaths mapped. Via The Guardian.

futurejournalismproject:

Syrian Death Map

Via the Guardian:

The conflict in Syria continues to claim lives, over a year since the war started - especially in west of the country. This map, created for us by the team at CartoDB, uses data from Syrian Shuhada - also used by the UN - and each circle represents the number of people who died each day. The play button starts the calendar of deaths, which can be paused at any point

Via CartoDB

One of these online activists involved in “the media war” is curating a casualties database based on information from several websites that have already documented killings or casualties from direct sources. The “Syrian Revolution Martyr Database” (www.SyrianShuhada.com) currently collects detailed info and links to 22.601 deaths since March, 2011…

…The Vizzuality team worked on the visualization. The map is powered by CartoDB to manage and serve the timeseries data and uses d3.js for the animated datapoints and graph.

The man behind the Syrian Suhada database —who did not share his personal information— launched the project in early May 2011. He designed the website and back-end database, and populated it initially with the first available data on casualties. Currently a team of 2 curate the data contained on the site

Image: Screenshot, Syria conflict: a year of deaths mapped. Via The Guardian.

Reblogged 1 year ago from futurejournalismproject
52 notes
lemonsandkiwi:

“Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak took a drastic step before his ouster:  He tried to shut down his country’s Internet. In an effort to silence  critics, the Mubarak government took major Internet service providers  off-line. Data scientist Kovas Boguta created this graphic to show how  the cutoff and eventual restoration affected Twitter users in the Middle  East. Twitter is a social media service through which brief messages  can be relayed to thousands at once. Boguta’s sample consists of a  selection of Mideast Twitter users who included the keywords (called  hashtags) #Jan25 and #Tahrir in messages.”

lemonsandkiwi:

“Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak took a drastic step before his ouster: He tried to shut down his country’s Internet. In an effort to silence critics, the Mubarak government took major Internet service providers off-line. Data scientist Kovas Boguta created this graphic to show how the cutoff and eventual restoration affected Twitter users in the Middle East. Twitter is a social media service through which brief messages can be relayed to thousands at once. Boguta’s sample consists of a selection of Mideast Twitter users who included the keywords (called hashtags) #Jan25 and #Tahrir in messages.”

Reblogged 2 years ago from lemonsandkiwi-deactivated201207
8 notes
Identifying Strategic Protest Routes for Civil Resistance: An Analysis of Optimal Approaches to Tahrir Square

Out of curiosity, Jessica began to wonder  whether the use of GIS data and spatial analysis might shed some light  on possible protest routes. She began her analysis by  identifying three  critical strategic elements for a successful protest route:
“1) Gathering points  where demonstrators initiate protests; 2) two types of routes—protest  collection areas of high population density through which protesters  walk to collect additional supporters and protest approach routes on  major streets that accommodate large groups that are more difficult to  disperse; and 3) convergence points where smaller groups of protester  merge to increase strength in order to approach the destination.”

Identifying Strategic Protest Routes for Civil Resistance: An Analysis of Optimal Approaches to Tahrir Square

Out of curiosity, Jessica began to wonder whether the use of GIS data and spatial analysis might shed some light on possible protest routes. She began her analysis by  identifying three critical strategic elements for a successful protest route:

“1) Gathering points where demonstrators initiate protests; 2) two types of routes—protest collection areas of high population density through which protesters walk to collect additional supporters and protest approach routes on major streets that accommodate large groups that are more difficult to disperse; and 3) convergence points where smaller groups of protester merge to increase strength in order to approach the destination.”

Posted 2 years ago
8 notes
Nato operations in Libya: data journalism breaks down which country does what

Nato's Libya operations are costing millions and involving thousands of airmen and sailors. But who’s contributing to Operation Unified Protector?  That’s the official name for the attacks on the Gadaffi regime’s bases  and tanks by Nato aircraft and ships, plus the enforcement of the no-fly  zone and the arms embargo.

Nato operations in Libya: data journalism breaks down which country does what

Nato's Libya operations are costing millions and involving thousands of airmen and sailors. But who’s contributing to Operation Unified Protector? That’s the official name for the attacks on the Gadaffi regime’s bases and tanks by Nato aircraft and ships, plus the enforcement of the no-fly zone and the arms embargo.

Posted 2 years ago
192 notes
Arab spring: an interactive timeline of Middle East protests 

Ever since a man in Tunisia burnt himself to death in December 2010 in protest at his treatment by police, pro-democracy rebellions have erupted across the Arab world. Our interactive timeline traces key events

Arab spring: an interactive timeline of Middle East protests

Ever since a man in Tunisia burnt himself to death in December 2010 in protest at his treatment by police, pro-democracy rebellions have erupted across the Arab world. Our interactive timeline traces key events

Posted 3 years ago
8 notes