For the Elderly, Diseases That Overlap

More than 700,00 people live in assisted-living centers, where they get help with daily activities like bathing and dressing. Most of the residents have multiple chronic health conditions.

For the Elderly, Diseases That Overlap

More than 700,00 people live in assisted-living centers, where they get help with daily activities like bathing and dressing. Most of the residents have multiple chronic health conditions.

Posted 1 year ago
3 notes
datavis:

Searching for Peace in Old Age by Hyperakt

datavis:

Searching for Peace in Old Age by Hyperakt

Reblogged 1 year ago from datavis
32 notes
oneofthepaths:

Interesting infographic on official and effective retirement age, and life expectancy. Comparison 1970-2010.
“According to a new report from the OECD, increases in the official retirement age are planned or underway in 28 out of its 34 member countries. As can be seen from the chart below, pensionable ages have failed to keep pace with longevity. This comes at an increasing cost to the state. The OECD expects governments’ expenditure on pensions to rise from 8.4% to 11.4% of GDP between 2010 and 2050. And in most countries people retire earlier than the official retirement age.”
(via Daily chart: Fun with pensions | The Economist)

oneofthepaths:

Interesting infographic on official and effective retirement age, and life expectancy. Comparison 1970-2010.

“According to a new report from the OECD, increases in the official retirement age are planned or underway in 28 out of its 34 member countries. As can be seen from the chart below, pensionable ages have failed to keep pace with longevity. This comes at an increasing cost to the state. The OECD expects governments’ expenditure on pensions to rise from 8.4% to 11.4% of GDP between 2010 and 2050. And in most countries people retire earlier than the official retirement age.”

(via Daily chart: Fun with pensions | The Economist)

Reblogged 2 years ago from oneofthepaths
14 notes
the-wrong-era:

This was for a project called ‘Information Is Beautiful’. We had to show the maximum ages of animals which was a bit annoying considering all the information thats out there. It turned out a bit depressing in the end but at the time it seemed like a good idea.

the-wrong-era:

This was for a project called ‘Information Is Beautiful’. We had to show the maximum ages of animals which was a bit annoying considering all the information thats out there. It turned out a bit depressing in the end but at the time it seemed like a good idea.

Reblogged 2 years ago from dead-fisch
14 notes
theatlantic:

The Very Real Economic Dangers of an Aging America

In the future, U.S. growth will be slower. Recessions will be deeper. Recoveries will be weaker. And there’s exactly one thing to blame.
Demographics.
That’s the stark conclusion from James Stock and Mark Watson in this fascinating, and occasionally depressing, new paper. In fact, they say, the future is now. For the last few years, we’ve weathered the beginning of what demographers have called the grey tsunami. “Most of the slow recovery [in today’s job market] is attributable to a long-term slowdown in trend employment growth,” Stock and Watson write.
The authors blame two demographic demons for our uncertain future: (1) the plateau in the female labor force participation rate, and (2) the aging of the U.S. workforce. Their underlying logic is that without continued growth in female workers or a significant boost in population, employment and GDP growth will slow, leaving us vulnerable to recessions with “steeper declines and slower recoveries.” In such a future, jobless recoveries will be the only recoveries we know.
Read more. [Image: Peter Bell, Ryan Morris]

theatlantic:

The Very Real Economic Dangers of an Aging America

In the future, U.S. growth will be slower. Recessions will be deeper. Recoveries will be weaker. And there’s exactly one thing to blame.

Demographics.

That’s the stark conclusion from James Stock and Mark Watson in this fascinating, and occasionally depressing, new paper. In fact, they say, the future is now. For the last few years, we’ve weathered the beginning of what demographers have called the grey tsunami. “Most of the slow recovery [in today’s job market] is attributable to a long-term slowdown in trend employment growth,” Stock and Watson write.

The authors blame two demographic demons for our uncertain future: (1) the plateau in the female labor force participation rate, and (2) the aging of the U.S. workforce. Their underlying logic is that without continued growth in female workers or a significant boost in population, employment and GDP growth will slow, leaving us vulnerable to recessions with “steeper declines and slower recoveries.” In such a future, jobless recoveries will be the only recoveries we know.

Read more. [Image: Peter Bell, Ryan Morris]

Reblogged 2 years ago from theatlantic
146 notes