The Age of Obama: Timelapse of President Barack Obama over four years in office

Time roughs up presidents. Photos of Barack Obama on Election Night 2008 look like they were taken much longer ago. Now his face has deeper creases and crow’s feet, while his hair has turned white. “You look at the picture when they’re inaugurated and four years later, they’re visibly older,” said Connie Mariano, White House physician from 1992 to 2001. “It’s like they went in a time machine and fast-forwarded eight years in the span of four years.”

The Age of Obama: Timelapse of President Barack Obama over four years in office

Time roughs up presidents. Photos of Barack Obama on Election Night 2008 look like they were taken much longer ago. Now his face has deeper creases and crow’s feet, while his hair has turned white. “You look at the picture when they’re inaugurated and four years later, they’re visibly older,” said Connie Mariano, White House physician from 1992 to 2001. “It’s like they went in a time machine and fast-forwarded eight years in the span of four years.”

Posted 1 year ago
26 notes

A comparison between 2009 and 2013 inaugural fundraising.

Obama discloses less about inaugural donors

What a difference four years makes: President Barack Obama, who began his first term with a promise to change the way Washington works, barred corporate donations to his first inauguration, capped individual contributions at $50,000 and began disclosing his donors and bundlers more than a month before his swearing-in.

To map votes, atlas digs below polls

A new interactive atlas that looks at the 2008 US presidential election precinct by precinct reveals how deep-rooted geographic trends still affect party affiliation.
There are red states, blue states, and, as the Nov. 6 election nears in the US, the indecisive “swinging purples.” But state- and county-level polls aren’t the whole story.
When presidential election results are examined at the level of individual polling places, subtler geographic trends emerge. Long-extinct transportation corridors and industrial centers remain deeply relevant determinants of voting trends in modern America. And looking at precinct-level data can illustrate the sometimes-stark political differences between adjacent neighborhoods in the counties thought of as simply “purple.”

To map votes, atlas digs below polls

A new interactive atlas that looks at the 2008 US presidential election precinct by precinct reveals how deep-rooted geographic trends still affect party affiliation.

There are red states, blue states, and, as the Nov. 6 election nears in the US, the indecisive “swinging purples.” But state- and county-level polls aren’t the whole story.

When presidential election results are examined at the level of individual polling places, subtler geographic trends emerge. Long-extinct transportation corridors and industrial centers remain deeply relevant determinants of voting trends in modern America. And looking at precinct-level data can illustrate the sometimes-stark political differences between adjacent neighborhoods in the counties thought of as simply “purple.”

Posted 1 year ago
9 notes
Timeline: How Obama Compares to Bush on Torture, Surveillance and Detention

As his reelection campaign ramps up, President Obama has touted his winding down of  the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. He’s also kept up the tough talk about the broader war against Al Qaeda. In 2008, Obama stressed that his presidency would break from George W. Bush’s most controversial national security policies. So we took a look back at some of those policies, to see how much has changed under Obama — and how much has stayed the same.

Timeline: How Obama Compares to Bush on Torture, Surveillance and Detention

As his reelection campaign ramps up, President Obama has touted his winding down of  the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. He’s also kept up the tough talk about the broader war against Al Qaeda. In 2008, Obama stressed that his presidency would break from George W. Bush’s most controversial national security policies. So we took a look back at some of those policies, to see how much has changed under Obama — and how much has stayed the same.

Posted 1 year ago
5 notes
London mayoral election 2008: how the city voted, mapped

Who voted for Boris in 2008? Where was Labour’s vote strongest? This map from Factmint shows how votes were distributed across the wards that make up the city. The detail means that patterns of voting emerge: from the BNP votes in the Essex boroughs, through to the distribution of Green party votes in 2008. What does it tell us about how London will vote in 2012? Use the dropdown menu to see how first and second preferences compare - and how each party fared

London mayoral election 2008: how the city voted, mapped

Who voted for Boris in 2008? Where was Labour’s vote strongest? This map from Factmint shows how votes were distributed across the wards that make up the city. The detail means that patterns of voting emerge: from the BNP votes in the Essex boroughs, through to the distribution of Green party votes in 2008. What does it tell us about how London will vote in 2012? Use the dropdown menu to see how first and second preferences compare - and how each party fared

Posted 2 years ago
2 notes
todayiopenedmyeyes:

This transport map proposed for Manchester in a 2008 publication about the transport system is cool.

todayiopenedmyeyes:

This transport map proposed for Manchester in a 2008 publication about the transport system is cool.

Reblogged 2 years ago from todayiopenedmyeyes
7 notes
From 2008 - Political NASCAR

Barack Obama and John McCain have raised millions of dollars for their presidential campaigns. In  GOOD’s second installment of Political NASCAR, we look at the uniforms  the two candidates would wear if companies wanted to use their political  donations as advertisements, and if running for president ended with  the winner doing donuts on the White House lawn.

There’s a great thread over on Reddit right now, with some good Photoshop work going on.
Update (via tllnbks)

(via meldroc)

From 2008 - Political NASCAR

Barack Obama and John McCain have raised millions of dollars for their presidential campaigns. In GOOD’s second installment of Political NASCAR, we look at the uniforms the two candidates would wear if companies wanted to use their political donations as advertisements, and if running for president ended with the winner doing donuts on the White House lawn.

There’s a great thread over on Reddit right now, with some good Photoshop work going on.

Update (via tllnbks)

John Boehner's NASCAR gear

(via meldroc)

Max Baucus' gear

Posted 3 years ago
340 notes